Shaloha from Hawaii

A few decades or more down the line, as our descendants begin to trace their ancestors (us!), they may be looking in some unusual places, including the Jewish section of a cemetery in Hilo, Hawaii.

Shaloha, of course, combines Shalom and Aloha.

The Canadian Jewish News recently had a great story on the Jewish community on Hawaii’s big island, where some 200 members of the Northern Hawaii Chavurah and Kona Beth Shalom (KBS) cover some 100 square miles.

The Big (Jewish) Kahuna is an orthopedic surgeon who arrived 11 years ago from Northern California. He’s the KBS lay leader, performs weddings and entertains with his klezmer band.

The story provides insight in how Jewish “pioneers” organize and provide for their isolated community.

Tracing the Tribe is waiting for the announcement of the Kona Jewish Genealogical Society!

Czech it out!

The discovery of the remains of a medieval Jewish cemetery in Pilsen, Czech Republic, was reported today by JTA.

Researchers from the West Bohemian Institute for Heritage Conservation and Documentation said they found city archival documents revealing details of what they believe was one of the largest 15th-century Jewish cemeteries in the region.

Although the burial ground was known to exist, an Institute archeologist said the new documents reveal additional details, and that excavations could provide more information about the cemetery and the Jewish community.

The Prague Monitor provided more details in its September 30 story.

The land for the cemetery was bought by Jews in 1432, and 40 years later, the land was taken from the Jews, who were then expelled in 1504, said Institute archeologist Radek Siroky.

He stressed the importance of medieval Jewish cemeteries in that Jewish burial grounds are usually well-conserved, unlike Christian graves.

For more on Pilsen:

Pilsen’s Great Synagogue, built in 1892, is believed to be the second largest in Europe, and the Old Pilsen Synagogue was built in 1859.

Shaloha from Hawaii

A few decades or more down the line, as our descendants begin to trace their ancestors (us!), they may be looking in some unusual places, including the Jewish section of a cemetery in Hilo, Hawaii.

Shaloha, of course, combines Shalom and Aloha.

The Canadian Jewish News recently had a great story on the Jewish community on Hawaii’s big island, where some 200 members of the Northern Hawaii Chavurah and Kona Beth Shalom (KBS) cover some 100 square miles.

The Big (Jewish) Kahuna is an orthopedic surgeon who arrived 11 years ago from Northern California. He’s the KBS lay leader, performs weddings and entertains with his klezmer band.

The story provides insight in how Jewish “pioneers” organize and provide for their isolated community.

Tracing the Tribe is waiting for the announcement of the Kona Jewish Genealogical Society!

Czech it out!

The discovery of the remains of a medieval Jewish cemetery in Pilsen, Czech Republic, was reported today by JTA.

Researchers from the West Bohemian Institute for Heritage Conservation and Documentation said they found city archival documents revealing details of what they believe was one of the largest 15th-century Jewish cemeteries in the region.

Although the burial ground was known to exist, an Institute archeologist said the new documents reveal additional details, and that excavations could provide more information about the cemetery and the Jewish community.

The Prague Monitor provided more details in its September 30 story.

The land for the cemetery was bought by Jews in 1432, and 40 years later, the land was taken from the Jews, who were then expelled in 1504, said Institute archeologist Radek Siroky.

He stressed the importance of medieval Jewish cemeteries in that Jewish burial grounds are usually well-conserved, unlike Christian graves.

For more on Pilsen:

Pilsen’s Great Synagogue, built in 1892, is believed to be the second largest in Europe, and the Old Pilsen Synagogue was built in 1859.