Yo ho ho … Oy! – Update

Following our posting on Swashbuckling Sephardic Pirates (check the Tracing the Tribe’s archives), here’s another on a more entertaining tack: Singing Yiddish Pirates.

If you were at this August’s International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, you surely enjoyed the very entertaining Zalmen Mlotek, executive director of the Folksbiene Theater in New York City, performing old Yiddish theater favorites.

If you liked that, you’ll love this one – wish I could be there — the Yiddish version of “The Pirates of Penzance” or Di Yam Gazlonim. And – you shouldn’t worry – it will be subtitled in English and Russian!

Mlotek is the musical director of this National Yiddish Theater production. This is the first full Yiddish production in the 127-year history of the Gilbert & Sullivan operetta.

It runs from October 29-November 12 in Manhattan, so those in the New York area should run to see it.

For the story of how it this came about, or to find out about tickets, click here.

Frequent reader Rita Tzohar in Rehovot, Israel, informs me that the above link now goes to the archives (pay for access), but that you can click here to read the NYT story and for tickets.

The Sound of Music

No, not the von Trapp family. This time, it’s the Kalter family.

When Logan Kleinwaks amassed information on some 3,200 Kalter family members, some of the clues led him to David Verbeeck, whose musical based on the Kalter family, “Portrait of a Silent Spring,” is having its New York premiere this weekend.

Kleinwaks and Verbeeck realized that the play’s main character, Moses Kalter, is their common ancestor; Kleinwaks is related through his mother’s family.

Some 60 Kalter relatives will be in the audience for “Portrait of a Silent Spring.”

The curtain rises and through the lifting darkness we hear Moses Kalter (David Verbeeck) reading from his love letter to his wife Chaja: “Sometimes we must return to yesterday to explain today.”

This is true not just for Moses but for the entire Kalter family, and specifically two men, from different parts of the world, whose love of family brought them together this weekend for an extraordinary event.

Read the rest of the story here

Yo ho ho … Oy! – Update

Following our posting on Swashbuckling Sephardic Pirates (check the Tracing the Tribe’s archives), here’s another on a more entertaining tack: Singing Yiddish Pirates.

If you were at this August’s International Conference on Jewish Genealogy, you surely enjoyed the very entertaining Zalmen Mlotek, executive director of the Folksbiene Theater in New York City, performing old Yiddish theater favorites.

If you liked that, you’ll love this one – wish I could be there — the Yiddish version of “The Pirates of Penzance” or Di Yam Gazlonim. And – you shouldn’t worry – it will be subtitled in English and Russian!

Mlotek is the musical director of this National Yiddish Theater production. This is the first full Yiddish production in the 127-year history of the Gilbert & Sullivan operetta.

It runs from October 29-November 12 in Manhattan, so those in the New York area should run to see it.

For the story of how it this came about, or to find out about tickets, click here.

Frequent reader Rita Tzohar in Rehovot, Israel, informs me that the above link now goes to the archives (pay for access), but that you can click here to read the NYT story and for tickets.

The Sound of Music

No, not the von Trapp family. This time, it’s the Kalter family.

When Logan Kleinwaks amassed information on some 3,200 Kalter family members, some of the clues led him to David Verbeeck, whose musical based on the Kalter family, “Portrait of a Silent Spring,” is having its New York premiere this weekend.

Kleinwaks and Verbeeck realized that the play’s main character, Moses Kalter, is their common ancestor; Kleinwaks is related through his mother’s family.

Some 60 Kalter relatives will be in the audience for “Portrait of a Silent Spring.”

The curtain rises and through the lifting darkness we hear Moses Kalter (David Verbeeck) reading from his love letter to his wife Chaja: “Sometimes we must return to yesterday to explain today.”

This is true not just for Moses but for the entire Kalter family, and specifically two men, from different parts of the world, whose love of family brought them together this weekend for an extraordinary event.

Read the rest of the story here