Do you have a mystery to solve?

A while ago, I mentioned Ancestors in the Attic, a Canadian show on History Television (History Channel elsewhere). Here’s an interview with its host, Jeff Douglas.

“All the stories are so great, you don’t want to leave stuff at the side of the road — you don’t want to leave stuff on the editing room floor,” says Douglas in the interview. “The second thing is just the sort of inherent struggle to take genealogy and make it visual.”

Canadian readers who have genealogy challenges they’d like the show to solve can post them here.

A scary group in the Census

While Halloween isn’t on the Jewish calendar, here’s a light-hearted look at what can be found in the US and UK Census collections, courtesy of Ancestry.com’s 24/7 Family History Circle.

Among the interesting folk they discovered are Frank and Fannie Frankenstein, Jacob Monster, as well as the Vampire, Devil, Pumpkin, Goblin and Ghoul families. Read the rest here.

Come Purim, I think I’ll check the censuses see if more of our favorites are lurking.

Do you have a mystery to solve?

A while ago, I mentioned Ancestors in the Attic, a Canadian show on History Television (History Channel elsewhere). Here’s an interview with its host, Jeff Douglas.

“All the stories are so great, you don’t want to leave stuff at the side of the road — you don’t want to leave stuff on the editing room floor,” says Douglas in the interview. “The second thing is just the sort of inherent struggle to take genealogy and make it visual.”

Canadian readers who have genealogy challenges they’d like the show to solve can post them here.

A scary group in the Census

While Halloween isn’t on the Jewish calendar, here’s a light-hearted look at what can be found in the US and UK Census collections, courtesy of Ancestry.com’s 24/7 Family History Circle.

Among the interesting folk they discovered are Frank and Fannie Frankenstein, Jacob Monster, as well as the Vampire, Devil, Pumpkin, Goblin and Ghoul families. Read the rest here.

Come Purim, I think I’ll check the censuses see if more of our favorites are lurking.

Tel Aviv: Rich resources

There’s an interesting building on the Tel Aviv University campus called the Museum of the Diaspora, or Beth Hatefutsoth in Hebrew.

Today, its focus is shifting from the Diaspora Jewish communities to a broader scope that sees all Jews, no matter where they live, as one people.

Although it opened in 1978, the behind-the-scenes holdings are not well known, even in Israel. However, the museum holds a wealth of material for genealogists.

While most visitors go there to see the permanent exhibits, the synagogue models from around the world, and the temporary art and country-focused exhibits, there are also remarkable archives for family history researchers.

For more information on the hidden treasures in music, film, photographs, and of course, in the genealogy center, click here for the new story I wrote for the Jerusalem Post’s Metro weekly.

Tel Aviv: Rich resources

There’s an interesting building on the Tel Aviv University campus called the Museum of the Diaspora, or Beth Hatefutsoth in Hebrew.

Today, its focus is shifting from the Diaspora Jewish communities to a broader scope that sees all Jews, no matter where they live, as one people.

Although it opened in 1978, the behind-the-scenes holdings are not well known, even in Israel. However, the museum holds a wealth of material for genealogists.

While most visitors go there to see the permanent exhibits, the synagogue models from around the world, and the temporary art and country-focused exhibits, there are also remarkable archives for family history researchers.

For more information on the hidden treasures in music, film, photographs, and of course, in the genealogy center, click here for the new story I wrote for the Jerusalem Post’s Metro weekly.