GenClass: January-March classes

GenClass.com offers online, short-term, fact-packed courses in a multitude of relevant subjects.

You might want to add one or more of these classes to your holiday wishlist!

Most of the founding instructors previously taught these successful online classes at MyFamily.com, and new staffers have since joined. The group now represents instructors living in the US, Canada, England, Scotland and Israel.

Classes for January, February and March 2008 are now open for registration, and include Jewish Basic Research and Jewish Internet Research. Micha Reisel and I team-teach those two classes.

In addition, new instructor Alexandra Goldberg will offer “Genealogy for Kids” in January. If you are wondering how to get your children interested in this quest, this might be the perfect introduction.

The classes will help prepare newcomers or more advanced researchers by providing essential tools and information.

Class offerings:

January 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 1
Genealogy for Kids
Jump Start your Genealogy!
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Native American Genealogy
Salt Lake City: Part 1 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!
Write Your Family History Step-by-Step

February 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Basic English Research
“Brick Wall” strategies
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 2
Eastern European Genealogy Research: Part 1 (Basic)
Family Tree Maker 2008 – Advanced
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Jewish Genealogy: Researching on the Internet (Part 2)
Northeastern United States Genealogy
Salt Lake City: Part 2 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!
Scottish Genealogy

March 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 3
Eastern European Genealogy Research: Part 2 (Intermediate)
Family Tree Maker 2008 – The Basics
Genealogy Research in the Great Lakes States
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Native American Genealogy
Organizing Your Family History
Salt Lake City: Part 1 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!

Seattle: Jews in China

Seattle’s Northwest Asian Weekly is the source for this story about China’s Jewish roots.

Rabbi Anson Laytner is executive director of the American Jewish Committee branch in Seattle, and board president of the California-based Sino-Judaic Institute. He’s spent some 20 years researching the history of Kaifeng and its Jewish community, established as early as the 8th century by Jews from Persia and India.

Laytner says in the story:

“What’s most astonishing, scholars found, is not only that Jewish communities existed in Kaifeng for centuries, but also that, for the most part, they coexisted with the native people peacefully.

Laytner said the Chinese treated the Jewish immigrants with respect and showed tolerance toward their religion. They even — perhaps unknowingly — influenced their belief system.

“Kaifeng Jews came up with a kind of Judaism that was kind of a synthesis of Jewish thought and Chinese thought,” he said.

Over the centuries, additional waves of Jews made their way into China finding refuge in Harbin, Tianjin and Hong Kong, with some 18,000 arriving in Shanghai during the Holocaust.

Global scholars travel east to learn about Sino-Judaic relations, and study steles (stone tablets with religious and genealogical inscriptions), to find historical clues.

However, Laytner said, scholars have found difficulty in getting Kaifeng authorities to cooperate with their research. He said authorities often deny visitors access to museums and important artifacts for unknown reasons.

He emphasized that the Jewish experience in China is crucial to study because it demonstrates a rare case of peaceful assimilation.

“I’m hoping we’ll be able to establish good working relationships in Kaifeng, both with authorities and with Kaifeng Jews. We just want them to cooperate with us in the spirit of friendship,” he said.

For more information, visit the Sino-Judaic Institute.

Read the story here

GenClass: January-March classes

GenClass.com offers online, short-term, fact-packed courses in a multitude of relevant subjects.

You might want to add one or more of these classes to your holiday wishlist!

Most of the founding instructors previously taught these successful online classes at MyFamily.com, and new staffers have since joined. The group now represents instructors living in the US, Canada, England, Scotland and Israel.

Classes for January, February and March 2008 are now open for registration, and include Jewish Basic Research and Jewish Internet Research. Micha Reisel and I team-teach those two classes.

In addition, new instructor Alexandra Goldberg will offer “Genealogy for Kids” in January. If you are wondering how to get your children interested in this quest, this might be the perfect introduction.

The classes will help prepare newcomers or more advanced researchers by providing essential tools and information.

Class offerings:

January 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 1
Genealogy for Kids
Jump Start your Genealogy!
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Native American Genealogy
Salt Lake City: Part 1 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!
Write Your Family History Step-by-Step

February 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Basic English Research
“Brick Wall” strategies
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 2
Eastern European Genealogy Research: Part 1 (Basic)
Family Tree Maker 2008 – Advanced
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Jewish Genealogy: Researching on the Internet (Part 2)
Northeastern United States Genealogy
Salt Lake City: Part 2 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!
Scottish Genealogy

March 2008

Adoption Investigative Class
Canadian Research – Internet Resources – Part 3
Eastern European Genealogy Research: Part 2 (Intermediate)
Family Tree Maker 2008 – The Basics
Genealogy Research in the Great Lakes States
Lost Friends and Family Investigative Class
Native American Genealogy
Organizing Your Family History
Salt Lake City: Part 1 – the Largest Genealogical Library in the World!

Seattle: Jews in China

Seattle’s Northwest Asian Weekly is the source for this story about China’s Jewish roots.

Rabbi Anson Laytner is executive director of the American Jewish Committee branch in Seattle, and board president of the California-based Sino-Judaic Institute. He’s spent some 20 years researching the history of Kaifeng and its Jewish community, established as early as the 8th century by Jews from Persia and India.

Laytner says in the story:

“What’s most astonishing, scholars found, is not only that Jewish communities existed in Kaifeng for centuries, but also that, for the most part, they coexisted with the native people peacefully.

Laytner said the Chinese treated the Jewish immigrants with respect and showed tolerance toward their religion. They even — perhaps unknowingly — influenced their belief system.

“Kaifeng Jews came up with a kind of Judaism that was kind of a synthesis of Jewish thought and Chinese thought,” he said.

Over the centuries, additional waves of Jews made their way into China finding refuge in Harbin, Tianjin and Hong Kong, with some 18,000 arriving in Shanghai during the Holocaust.

Global scholars travel east to learn about Sino-Judaic relations, and study steles (stone tablets with religious and genealogical inscriptions), to find historical clues.

However, Laytner said, scholars have found difficulty in getting Kaifeng authorities to cooperate with their research. He said authorities often deny visitors access to museums and important artifacts for unknown reasons.

He emphasized that the Jewish experience in China is crucial to study because it demonstrates a rare case of peaceful assimilation.

“I’m hoping we’ll be able to establish good working relationships in Kaifeng, both with authorities and with Kaifeng Jews. We just want them to cooperate with us in the spirit of friendship,” he said.

For more information, visit the Sino-Judaic Institute.

Read the story here