World Jewish Studies: Ladino, Music, Women

The purpose of listing these topics from the World Jewish Studies conference is to inspire readers as to diverse Jewish topics, to raise awareness of their own personal histories, and to show what is being discussed in various venues.

Readers may be inspired to research a topic that may connect to their own ancestry.

This list covers a wide geographical map: Mediterranean, Dubrovnik, Turkey, US, Israel, the Balkans, Serbia, Sarajevo, Bosnia, Saloniki, Ottoman Empire, Vienna, Tetuan, Yemen, Morocco, UK, Italy and even Copenhagen.

Topics include women’s studies, Internet, journals, Aramaic, ethnomusicology, books, manuscripts and much more.

This post includes programs in folklore, linguistics, journalism, documents, culture, literature, poetry, Sephardic culture, Ladino, music and Judeo-Arabic (S=Spanish, H-Hebrew, E=English, L=Ladino).

Sephardic Culture:
Paloma Diaz-Mas (S) Ephemera Sefardies
Alisa Meyuhas-Ginio (S) La prensa y la literature en ladino como agentes de modernización dentro de las comunidades sefardíes del Mediteráneo oriental
Ivana Burdelez (E) New Aspects of Dubrovnik Jewish History

Judeo-Spanish: Linguistic Aspects
Derya Agis (E) Turkish Words with Derivational and Inflectional Affixes in Judeo-Spanish: An Optimality Theory Approach
Djodje Konforti (E) Ladino Orthography
Angel Berenguer Amador (S) La sintaxis del subjuntivo en judeoespañol
Rafael Arnol (S) Perspectivas en la Lexicografia historica del Judeo-espanyol

Language, Society and Identity:
Yaakov Bentolila (S) Como se trocan los refranes: proverbios en Haketίa a la luz de sus variants
Luisa Kluger (E) Ladino in the United States: The Effect of Social Factors

Ivana Vučina Simović (E) Language Maintenance or Shift through the Rise of Zionism in Sephardic Communities of the Former Yugoslavia

Literature, Poetry:
Katja Smid (S) Los Ma‛asiyot de Damésec Eli‛éźer
Rachel Saba-Wolfe (L) La boz del prove: manifestasiones de las luchas entre proves i rikos en la komunita de Izmir – bazadas sovre el foyeton Shavaat Aniim 1847 i dos koplas umoristikas
Susana Dora Gruss (S) La creación literaria de Judá Haim Perahiá en Ladino
Matilda Koen-Sarano (S) A kualo sierve saver linguas: Djohá en el mundo moderno
Andrea Zinato (S) Cancionero y romancero sefardies: algunas consideraciones sobre la metrica
Moshe Shaul (S) La koleksion de kantes judeo-espanyoles del Proyekkto Folklor de Kol Israel
Krinka Vidakovic Petrov (E) Transformations of Sephardic Oral Poetry in the Balkans
Renee Levine Melammed (E) Tradition and Modernity in the Eyes of a Ladino Poetess from Salonika

Sephardic Musical Traditions in Transition:
Susana Weich-Shahak (S) Esrtuctura Poetica y Nucleo Tematico en el Romancero Sefardi Marion Maeder (E) The Role of the Radio in Relocating and Reshaping Judeo-Spanish Song in Israel
Judith R. Cohen (E) Ladinokomunita on the Road: An Ethnomusicologist’s Fieldwork Dream Come True
Rivka Havassy (H) Between the Dentist and the Pot-Mender (el Estañador): The Ladino Song as a Crossroads

Sephardic Jews and Visual Culture:
Jelena Erdeljan (E) Sephardic Funerary Monuments from Niš: A Comparative Analysis of Form and Iconography
Nenad Makuljević (E)Sephardim and the Visual Culture of the Ottoman Balkans
Ivan Stevović (E) Jewish Architecture on the Territory of Present-Day Serbia: The Age of Revivalism
Mirjam Rajner (E) Between Local and Universal: Sephardic Artists in Sarajevo on the Eve of the Holocaust

Communities:
Michael Halevy-Studemund (E) Sephardic Culture in Vienna
Nevad Kahteran (E) Contribution to the Study of the Work of Professor Muhamad Nezirovic (1934–2008) and the Bosnian Sephardic Heritage (“The Sephardim of Bosnia”)
Karen Gerson Şarhon (E) The Ladino Database Project in Istanbul
Beki Bardavid (S) La Vida de los Judios de Turkiya entre 1850–1950

Documents, Translations and Journalism:
Shifra Hannah Sznol (S)‛ La bendición de Yaakov’ (Génesis 49) en lengua griega y en lengua laaz a la luz del Pentateuco de Constantinopla (1547)
Zelda Ovadia (S) La revista culturala en Judeo-Espanyo Aki Yerushalayim
Maria Sanchez Perez (S) Yerushalayim: Una Revista Sefardi de Comienzos del Siglo XX Romeu-Ferre Pilar (S) Dos cedulones en jaquetía publicados en Orán en 1879 por la imprenta Karsenty

Acculturation and Modernization among the Sephardim:
Gila Hadar (S) Reina Cohen: una erudita judia de Saloniki
Julia R. Lieberman (E) Adolescence and the Period of Apprenticeship among the Western Sephardim, 16th-17th Centuries
Devin E. Naar (E) The Exiled Sons of Salonika: Articulating “Sephardi” Identity and Homeland in Early 20th-Century New York
Yaron Ben Naeh (H) Ottoman Jews: Jews in the Sphere of Ladino

Sephardic Folklore:
Eliezer Papo (E) Inter-Genre Contacts: The Proverb in the Judeo-Spanish Parodies on the Passover Haggadah
Tamar Alexander (E) Marching on Love Notes: The Personal Narrative of a Salonikan Woman who Survived the Shoah
Michal Held (E) “The People Who Almost Forgot”: Ladino Forums on the Internet as an Imagined Community and a New Folkloristic Territory
Nina Pinto-Abecasis (H) Nicknames as a Unique Folklore Genre: The Case of Tetuan’s Haketia-Speaking Jewish Community
Vered Madar (H) Lamentations of Jewish Women from Yemen: Between Constructing and De-Constructing Collective Identity and Memory

Judeo-Arabic
Modern Aramaic and Judaeo-Arabic Dialects:
Joseph Chetrit (H) Free-Speaking and Formulaic-Speaking in the Judaeo-Arabic Text of Family Complaints Presented to the Rabbinical Court of Mogador (Morocco)
Geoffrey Khan (E) Some Cases of Syntactic Diversity in the Jewish Neo-Aramaic Dialects
Ibrahim Bassal (H) Substrata of Aramaic Dialects in Colloquial Arabic in Palestine (Eretz Yisrael)

Mati Meyer (E) From Zion to Constantinople: The Ups and Downs of a Biblical Image
Sarit Shalev-Eyni (E) The Feast of the Righteous in the Ambrosian Bible: Old Tradition, New Context
Dalia-Ruth Halperin (E) The Theosophical-Kabbalah of the Nahmanides School and the Six Days of Creation in the Sarajevo Haggadah
Sara Offenberg (E) An Inverted Hunt Scene: Motifs of Jewish-Christian Polemic in the Illumination of the Liturgical Poem “El Mitnase”

Jewish Motifs from the Early Renaissance to the 18th Century:
Suzy Sitbon (E) The Circle and its Metamorphosis in the Illumination of Some Spanish and Portuguese Medieval Massoretic Bibles of the 13th-15th Centuries
Ilona Steimann (E) Hebrew Manuscripts from the Collection of Hartmann Schedel (1440–1514)

Ruthie Kalman (H) The Mountain, Eagle and Olive Garland in the Rambam’s Mishneh Torah (1574): Is it Really a Simple Printer’s Mark?
Ulf G. Haxen (E) Yehudah Leib ben Eliyahu HaCohen’s Haggadah, Copenhagen 1769

Sephardic Jews and Visual Culture:
Jelena Erdeljan (E) Sephardic Funerary Monuments from Niš: A Comparative Analysis of Form and Iconography
Nenad Makuljević (E) Sephardim and the Visual Culture of the Ottoman Balkans
Ivan Stevović (E) Jewish Architecture on the Territory of Present-Day Serbia: The Age of Revivalism
Mirjam Rajner (E) Between Local and Universal: Sephardic Artists in Sarajevo on the Eve of the Holocaust
Irit Miller (E) Artist, Patron, and the Public Space: S. J. Solomon, S. Montagu and English History Painting

Music:
James Loeffler (E) In Which Direction Do Hebrews Play Music? Abraham Zvi Idelsohn and the Musical Aesthetics of Zionism
Noah Gerber (E) The Father of Jewish Musicology and the Natives: Abraham Zvi Idelsohn and the Yemenites
Judah M. Cohen (E) A Crossroads of Jewish Music Scholarship: A. Z. Idelsohn and the Publication of Jewish Music in its Historical Development
Sharon Bernstein (E) The Cantillation of the Pentateuch According to the Italian Tradition of Turin
Don Harran (E) The Levi Dynasty: Three Generations of Jewish Musicians in 16th-Century Mantua

Sephardic Musical Traditions in Transition:
Susana Weich-Shahak (S) Esrtuctura Poetica y Nucleo Tematico en el Romancero Sefardi Marion Maeder (E) The Role of the Radio in Relocating and Reshaping Judeo-Spanish Song in Israel
Judith R. Cohen (E) Ladinokomunita on the Road: An Ethnomusicologist’s Fieldwork Dream Come True
Rivka Havassa (H) Between the Dentist and the Pot-Mender (el Estañador): The Ladino Song as a Crossroads

Liturgical Music Memory of Spanish and Portuguese Jews:
Daniel Halfon (E) The Portuguese Hazzan Today
Essica Marks (H) Musical Characteristics of the Spanish Portuguese Liturgical Music
Yosef Goldenberg (H) The Complex of Identities in Balkan Influences on Israeli Music

Jewish Women’s Identity in Times of National Struggle
Margalit Shilo (H) Building the Nation and Constructing the New Identity of the Hebrew Woman during the Mandate Period
Anat Granit-Hacohen (H) Jewish Women from Palestine in the British Forces in the Second World War: A Case Study of Nationality and Gender
Lilach Rosenberg-Friedman (H) Women’s Leadership in the Ha‘apala: Ada Sireni as a Case Study
Efrat Seckbach (H) The Gendered Identity of a 1948-Generation Woman according to Memoirs

Which programs would you have liked to attend?
Which programs might include your personal history or your personal interests?

Chicago: Rugelach now online

When the going gets hard, mortgage bankers turn to baking rugelach – and sell them online – according to a story in the Chicago Tribune (see below).

If you don’t know what rugelach are, you don’t know what you’re missing.

Google tells us that this Ashkenazi pastry is made with a cream cheese dough and different fillings, of fruits and nuts. There are recipes using hazelnuts, sour cherries, chocolate, raisins, toffee, walnuts, apricots and anything a cook can think to add or combine. My favorite is chocolate.

In America, the dough has butter and cream cheese and is cut into triangles and then wrapped around the filling to make crescents that should melt in your mouth. Food historians claim that the cream cheese is an American addition and that back in Europe only butter was used, meaning observant Jews cannot eat these delights with meat meals.

A parve (no dairy) rugelach isn’t worth the trouble it takes to make, in my humble opinion.

In Yiddish, it is spelled רוגלך and is a diminutive of the Hebrew רוגלית (roglit). Genealogists are used to spelling variations, so choose your favorite from among rugelach, rugulach, rugalach, ruggalach, rogelach, rugalah, rugala. According to Wikipedia (always taken with a salt shaker) it means “creeping vine,” perhaps because it is rolled up. Others say it means “little twist.” What’s in a name? In my dictionary, the definition is “delicious.”

Even the Chicago Tribune is kvelling (happy praise, Yiddish) about this nostalgic product marketed in a very contemporary way – just in time for Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, which begins September 18.

There are still some old fashioned Jewish bakeries in New York and other major cities, but their ranks are thinning. If customers can’t come to the few bakeries, then the bakeries will go to their customers – via the Internet.

Old-style Jewish bakeries are a dwindling lot, but one Chicago Web site entrepreneur has taken up the call for rugelach, the cream cheese- and butter-rich pastries that reside in the food memories of many Jewish people — old and young alike.

Leon Greenberg, a former mortgage banker, turned his passion for cooking into a catering and online rugelach business. Greenberg comes from a large rugelach-loving family. He once brought 500 pieces to a family reunion in the Bahamas. But it really wasn’t a burden.

Leon’s father had been hocking (encouraging strenuously, Yiddish) him for two years to create a Web site to sell his rugelach. He finally gave in to his father and is shocked at the response.

He launched his Internet business just after July 4, and the “Rugelach Man” already has more than 600 Facebookfans. Most of his orders are from Chicago, but the former New Yorker is proud that New York — where rugelach fans can be rather uncompromising — has the second-highest number of customers.

He bakes out of a professional kitchen and plans to hire helpers for the holiday rush. Currently, his flavor list includes apricot, chocolate, cinnamon sugar, macaroon and raspberry, at a cost of $19 per pound.

I wonder if he ships to Israel? There is a place in the Jerusalem Bus Station that does make excellent chocolate ones, but still nothing like those in the Bronx or Brooklyn from long ago.

For more information, visit Rugelach Man.

Thanks for this item to my good friend Chicago-based Thomas MacEntee of Geneabloggers.com who knows what good rugelach taste like! He grew up with good Jewish bakeries and delis in upstate New York (e.g., Kaplan’s in Monticello). You don’t have to be Jewish to love rugelach. Yum!

Click here for the famous Joan Nathan’s great recipe for either chocolate or apricot rugelach.

World Jewish Studies: Holocaust topics

The conference also covered sociology, immigration, issues of color, the Holocaust and its aftermath, including displaced persons in Italy.

Tracing the Tribe recommends viewing these topics and seeing which reflect what you would like to know more about or that may have personal implications to your own research

Geographically, the list covers Japan, Italy, France, US, India, the Vatican, and Greece.

(E=English, H=Hebrew)

Jews, Color, Race:
Gary Phillip Zola (E) “Bone of Our Bone and Flesh of Our Flesh”: The Judaization of Abraham Lincoln
Gil Ribak (E) “The Jew Usually Left Those Crimes to Esau”: Immigrant Jewish Responses to Accusations of Jewish Criminality in New York City, 1908–1912
Shlomi Deloia (E) Race, Whiteness, and the Jewish American Immigration Novel of the 1920s
Efraim Sicher (E) The “Jew’s Passage to India”: Race, Color, and Hybridity in Desai and Rushdie
Shmuel Trigano (E) Towards a Sociology of Judaism
Inbal Ester Cicurel (H) Karaites in Israel: A Religious Community in Changes

Attitude Towards the Jews in the Axis States:
Tommaso Dell’era (E) The Catholic Church, Racism and Anti-Semitism (1934–1939): New Documentation from the Vatican Archives
Maria Costanza-Caredio (E) The Italian Racial Laws
Simona Salustri (E) The Reinstatement of Jewish Teachers in Italian Universities
Chizuko Takao (E) Japan Faces its Jews

Studies in Holocaust Research:
Miriam Gillis-Carlebach (H) A Look at the Suffering and Resourcefulness of Holocaust-Surviving Children as Expressed in Their Own Testimonies
Hava Eshkoli (H) The Plan of Resettlement of Jewish Refugees in Alaska during the Holocaust
Yitzchak Kerem (H) Reevaluation of Rescue in Thessaloniki

Jewish Displaced Persons in Italy after the Holocaust:
Cinzia Villani(E) The Arrival and Early Stay of Jewish DPs in Italy: The South Tyrol-Milan Route
Arturo Marzano (E) Between Florence and Rome: The Presence of Jewish DPs in Central Italy
Elena Mazzini (E) The Representation of Jewish DP’s in the Italian Press and in Memoir Writing

Tracing the Tribe hopes that this series will inspire, raise awareness and encourage readers to explore their own history as well as Jewish history in general.

World Jewish Studies: Latin American topics

The World Jewish Studies Conference, held in Israel during August, also covered Latin American Jewry.

Readers may ask the purpose of listing topics from a conference that has concluded. Tracing the Tribe believes that this list, and the others to follow in other posts, will inspire, educate and encourage readers to investigate topics of interest relevant to their own history or those in which they may have other interests.

These topics cover important volunteer participation in archival projects, organization of collections, and information on specific communities (Mexico, Morocco, Argentina, US, Israel) .

Here’s that section of topics, which was sponsored at the conference by the Latin American Jewry Research Association (Sección del Judaísmo Latinoamericano AMILAT – Asociación de Investigación del Judaísmo Latinoamericano).

Here’s some of what you missed (S=Spanish, E=English, H=Hebrew):

Special Panel on Archives with Collections on Latin American Jewry
Alicia Gojman de Backal (E) The Documentation Center of the Ashkenazi Community in Mexico City and its Recognition by UNESCO
Project of Registration of Documentation in Israeli Archives by members of the Israeli Association for Promotion of Jewish Latin American Studies
Hadasa Assulin (E) Latin American Volunteers and their Contribution to the Archive’s Work
Moshe Goler (H) Recruitment of Volunteers
Theodor Bar Shalom (H) Organization and Registration of Material from Latin America
Iosef Rozen (H) Organization and Registration of the Collection of the Jewish Colonization Association

American Jewish Communities of Syrian Origin
Margalit Bejarano (E) Between Law and Reality: Mixed Marriages and Conversions among Syrian Ladino Speakers and Moroccan Jews in Buenos Aires
Sarina Roffé (E) The Takanah Against Marriage to Converts of the Syrian and Near Eastern Communities of Brooklyn
Alicia Hamui Halabe (E) La “Retakanización” de la Comunidad Maguén David en México
Susana Brauner (S) Religión, etnicidad y política: los argentinos-judíos de origen sirio

Tracing the Tribe is investigating whether the transcripts will be posted for the sessions and will report back.

Jerusalem: 9th Jewish Names Conference

In recent years, it seems the International Conference for the Study of Jewish Names is always scheduled up against the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

Tracing the Tribe does not understand this type of scheduling as the prospective audience is the same for both conferences. Arranging to have these two events follow each other in the same geographic location would certainly add to the richness of Jewish genealogy.

Be that as it may, here’s some of what you missed (E=English, H=Hebrew):

Jewish Names in the Modern World
Alexander Beider (E) The Notion of “Jewish Surnames”
Aaron Demsky (E) Jewish Names and the Shoah
Marlene Schiffman (E) Names and Governments: The Historical Effect of Modern Governments on Jewish Names
Ruth Moussaioff-Mason (E) Name Changes and Identity Problems among Ethiopian Jewish Immigrants

Sepharad and Exile
Eunate Mirones Lozano (E) Jaffe, Ederra and Hermoso: One Name in Three Languages for the Same People
Harry Fox (H) The Persistence of the Names of Expelled Jews in Narbonne
Gloria Mound (E) New Onomastic Discoveries in Cuba and Puerto Rico

Different Sources of Personal Names
Meir Lubetski (E) A Pre-Exilic Seal Containing an Unusual Name
Sara Friedman (H) When Aliza met Chedorlaomer: Proper Names in Hebrew Translation
Erga Heller/Vered Tohar (H) Students’ and Teachers’ Names in Hebrew Children’s Literature

Names in Eastern/Western Jewish Communities
Victor Hayoun (H) Tombstone Inscriptions as Part of an Onomastic Study of the Jewish Community of Nabeul, Tunisia
Esther Shkalim (H) Family Names of Iranian Jews: Sources and Meanings
Zofia Abramowicz (E) The Role of the Name in Jewish Self-Identification in Podlasie (Poland) in the 16th-20th Centuries
Marcy Brink-Danan (E) Temporality and Turkish-Jewish Onomastics
Dina Dahbany-Miraglia (E) The Power of the WORD: Yemenite Jews – Names and Naming
Vitaly Shalem (E) Traditional Names of the Mountain Jews: An Etymological Analysis
Ruven Enoch (H) Place-Names in Georgia Connected to Jews and Judaism

Jewish Toponymy
Esther Admit (H) Saloniki and her Names: A Chapter in Hebrew Toponymy from the Beginning of Printing to the 20th Century
Lea Mazor (H) Making the Wilderness Bloom in Place Names from the First Decade of the Nation
Elinoar Bareket (H) Biblical Hebrew Names for Settlements, Countries and Ethnic Groups in the Middle Ages

The Jewish genealogy section of the conference included these presentations:

Jewish Genealogy: An Emerging Field in Jewish Studies
Aaron Demsky (E) Abbaye’s Family History: A Study in Rabbinic Genealogy
Joseph B. Glass/Ruth Kark (E) Jewish Genealogical Research and the Historical Geography of the Land of Israel: Lessons from the Study of the Sephardi Entrepreneurial Elite
H. Daniel Wagner (E) Genealogical Database Merging: A Tool for the Virtual Reconstitution of Vanished Jewish Communities
Neville J. Lamdan (E) Jewish Genealogy: A Legitimate Field for Academic Research?

Many of these name topics seem well-suited to the International Jewish genealogy conferences and program committees for the next two events might want to read these carefully.

Jerusalem: 9th Jewish Names Conference

In recent years, it seems the International Conference for the Study of Jewish Names is always scheduled up against the International Conference on Jewish Genealogy.

Tracing the Tribe does not understand this type of scheduling as the prospective audience is the same for both conferences. Arranging to have these two events follow each other in the same geographic location would certainly add to the richness of Jewish genealogy.

Be that as it may, here’s some of what you missed (E=English, H=Hebrew):

Jewish Names in the Modern World
Alexander Beider (E) The Notion of “Jewish Surnames”
Aaron Demsky (E) Jewish Names and the Shoah
Marlene Schiffman (E) Names and Governments: The Historical Effect of Modern Governments on Jewish Names
Ruth Moussaioff-Mason (E) Name Changes and Identity Problems among Ethiopian Jewish Immigrants

Sepharad and Exile
Eunate Mirones Lozano (E) Jaffe, Ederra and Hermoso: One Name in Three Languages for the Same People
Harry Fox (H) The Persistence of the Names of Expelled Jews in Narbonne
Gloria Mound (E) New Onomastic Discoveries in Cuba and Puerto Rico

Different Sources of Personal Names
Meir Lubetski (E) A Pre-Exilic Seal Containing an Unusual Name
Sara Friedman (H) When Aliza met Chedorlaomer: Proper Names in Hebrew Translation
Erga Heller/Vered Tohar (H) Students’ and Teachers’ Names in Hebrew Children’s Literature

Names in Eastern/Western Jewish Communities
Victor Hayoun (H) Tombstone Inscriptions as Part of an Onomastic Study of the Jewish Community of Nabeul, Tunisia
Esther Shkalim (H) Family Names of Iranian Jews: Sources and Meanings
Zofia Abramowicz (E) The Role of the Name in Jewish Self-Identification in Podlasie (Poland) in the 16th-20th Centuries
Marcy Brink-Danan (E) Temporality and Turkish-Jewish Onomastics
Dina Dahbany-Miraglia (E) The Power of the WORD: Yemenite Jews – Names and Naming
Vitaly Shalem (E) Traditional Names of the Mountain Jews: An Etymological Analysis
Ruven Enoch (H) Place-Names in Georgia Connected to Jews and Judaism

Jewish Toponymy
Esther Admit (H) Saloniki and her Names: A Chapter in Hebrew Toponymy from the Beginning of Printing to the 20th Century
Lea Mazor (H) Making the Wilderness Bloom in Place Names from the First Decade of the Nation
Elinoar Bareket (H) Biblical Hebrew Names for Settlements, Countries and Ethnic Groups in the Middle Ages

The Jewish genealogy section of the conference included these presentations:

Jewish Genealogy: An Emerging Field in Jewish Studies
Aaron Demsky (E) Abbaye’s Family History: A Study in Rabbinic Genealogy
Joseph B. Glass/Ruth Kark (E) Jewish Genealogical Research and the Historical Geography of the Land of Israel: Lessons from the Study of the Sephardi Entrepreneurial Elite
H. Daniel Wagner (E) Genealogical Database Merging: A Tool for the Virtual Reconstitution of Vanished Jewish Communities
Neville J. Lamdan (E) Jewish Genealogy: A Legitimate Field for Academic Research?

Many of these name topics seem well-suited to the International Jewish genealogy conferences and program committees for the next two events might want to read these carefully.