Vancouver, BC. Jewish Museum, April events

The Jewish Museum and Archives of British Columbia has April programs focusing on women’s history and Jewish summer camps, and has announced a new book and a new online archive for a local Jewish newspaper.

The Women’s History Fair will display more than 20 displays from museums, archives, historical societies, cultural groups, schools and more in cooperation with the Women’s History Network of British Columbia. Jewish women pioneers are part of the exhibit.

The exhibit takes place Saturday, April 10, from 1-4pm, at the Central Library, 350 West Georgia St. Admission is free. It is co-sponsored by the VPL Special Collections, Herstory Cafe and the Vancouver Courier.

Michael Schwartz will present a curator’s talk on the Home Away From Home exhibit which focuses on British Columbia’s Jewish summer camps, on Thursday, April 15, from 7-9pm. Admission is free.

The exhibit runs through October 7, and includes hundreds of photographs from Camp Miriam, Camp Hatikvah and Camp Solomon Schechter. Explore the camp histories and view interactive displays including camp alumni interviews, photographs and songs. Visit Sunday-Thursday, from 10am-5pm.

Since the 1930s, the children of the BC Jewish community have attended Jewish summer camps in BC and elsewhere. They have learned about Jewish history and ethics, the history and politics of Israel, and developed a strong sense of community. When asked about their experiences at camp, alumni often say that their dearest and longest lasting friendships began at the age of seven or eight, in their first days at camp. The exhibit explores such lasting impressions and features an array of photographs, artifacts and interactive displays. Jewish Camps featured in the exhibit include Camp Miriam, Camp Hatikvah, and Camp Solomon Schechter.

Schwartz was a Camp Miriam long-time staff member and served as executive director in 2006 and 2007, and as programming director in 2005. He earned an MA in History (University of Toronto) and worked as a researcher and coordinator at the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre.

The Jewish Western Bulletin which changed its name to the Jewish Independent in 2005, has been the British Columbia Jewish community’s newspaper since 1930. Currently, it is published 49 weeks of the year.

Originally labeled “The Organ of the Jewish Community Centre,” the Jewish Western Bulletin was first published as a newspaper October 9, 1930. It superseded the Jewish Centre News, a publication that had existed under a series of names since 1923. Issues of the Jewish Western Bulletin and its precursor publications dating from 1923 – 2004 have been digitized using OCR technology and are made available on the Multicultural Canada website.

The project was made possible through the financial support of the Irving K. Barber BC Digitization Program, Multicultural Canada, the National Archival Development Program (NADP), Simon Fraser University and the THEN/HiER History Education Network.

A new book on sale at the Museum is the 50-year history of Camp Solomon Schechter, by David Michael Smith.

Established in 1955 by Rabbi Joshua Stampfer and his colleague Rabbi Joseph Wagner, Camp Solomon Schechter aimed to fill a gap by providing the Jewish families of the Pacific Northwest with the region’s first kosher summer camp.

Its 156 glossy pages chronicles the history and life of camp with photos, illustrations and alumni experiences. The price is $10 (softcover), $12 (hardcover) plus S&H.

For more information, send an email, or view the Museum website.

JGSLA 2010: What you will find!

Don’t bother getting vaccinated for the genealogy bug – it won’t help! Just be prepared for an amazing genealogy immersion experience this year.

From gold-rush pioneers to goniffs, from geo-tagging to gazetteers, and many other exciting topics, JGSLA 2010 has gathered experts, archivists, professors and authors from around the world to share their knowledge of a diverse range of fascinating topics with you and your fellow conference attendees.

These experts will bring genealogy – and possibly your personal genealogy – to life and present a new world of possibilities.

Regardless of whether you identify as a mind-mapper, Google geek, PC-pusher, Mac-Maven, Litvak, Galitzianer or “somewhere in Russia,” JGSLA 2010 is for you!

In fact, you don’t even need to be Jewish or researching your Jewish heritage – many programs provide general information, no matter what you are personally researching.

You’ll never know whom you’ll connect with at lunch, having a cup of coffee or taking a workshop. A long lost cousin? Descendants of your ancestral village? Someone investigating your family?

Will this be the year you find someone to share your research, to collaborate with others, to design a website for your research interests? Will a new resource or database provide that all-important clue enabling a major breakthrough?

You won’t know unless you come to this year’s conference!

A few tidbits:

— Ancestry will provide classes and a free (by-appointment) digital scanning service for attendees.

— JewishGen’s Warren Blatt and Michael Tobias will present “JewishGen LIVE at L.A. LIVE” on their latest databases and search capabilities.

— Steve Morse, a household genealogy name, will present a series on his website’s resources, but his new program, presented with daughter Megan, will be “DNA and the Animal Kingdom: Evolution and Genealogy in the Natural World.”

Stay tuned for news on workshops, special interest groups, birds-of-a-feather groups, films, breakfasts and tours. Everything you need to know is at JGSLA 2010.

Genetic testing: Affordable vs future research

In the wake of a Federal court’s ruling last week against a Utah company holding patents for BRCA1 and BRCA2, Tracing the Tribe has some questions.

On the plus side, Tracing the Tribe believes that companies now wishing to provide lower-cost, more affordable, genetic testing will be able to do so – eventually – although legal experts believe the case will land in the Supreme Court.

Note that Tracing the Tribe is not talking DNA genetic genealogy testing, but rather testing for specific genetic conditions/diseases. The questions are relevant because some patent holders charge high fees for those tests, restricting affordable access to those who may want or need those tests.

Please chime in here, dear readers:

(1) Should genetic testing for specific conditions/diseases be made more affordable and accessible, e.g. low-cost, to everyone?

(2) Should high fees be demanded of those wishing to test – to provide financing for research on those conditions.

(3) Who owns your DNA? (according to this case, it isn’t the DNA patent-holder).

(4) Because this is a Jewish genealogy blog, Tracing the Tribe is well aware that when Tay-Sachs testing (a tragic, nearly fatal by age 3, neurological disease) went worldwide, the incidence of its occurrence dropped by some 98%. This was due to widespread, affordable, accessible testing across the Jewish world. There are many other genetic diseases impacting mostly those of Jewish heritage. Shouldn’t those families have affordable access to lower-cost testing?

According to paper, the DNA industry is waiting to hear the reaction to the ruling .

Scientists and health advocates sued Utah-based Myriad Genetics, which held patents for two genes, BRCA-1 and BRCA-2, linked to breast and ovarian cancers. The groups alleged that the patents were improper because the DNA was a natural substance in the human body. The federal judge sided with the plaintiffs, invalidating parts of the patents.

Ken Alltucker’s article says that researchers and companies are interested because the ruling could impact many other genes.

The ruling is critical because an estimated 20 percent of human genes have been patented. Companies launched based on those patents, with investors betting that companies could profitably develop drugs or devices targeting an individual’s unique DNA.

But critics argue that such patents stymie research. Scientists often are required to get permission from the gene patent holders before using the information for research. Some companies even charge fees to use them.

The story quoted Arizona BioIndustry Association president Robert Green:

“The key in biotechnology is you have to raise a lot of money to get to the cure and get to the product. You can only raise that money if investors know you have some patent protection. If you don’t have that, there is no incentive for people to invest in these risky technologies.”

Some 20% of human genes have been patented, according to the story. Investors betted that companies could develop drugs or devices based on a unique DNA.