World Jewish Studies: Holocaust topics

The conference also covered sociology, immigration, issues of color, the Holocaust and its aftermath, including displaced persons in Italy.

Tracing the Tribe recommends viewing these topics and seeing which reflect what you would like to know more about or that may have personal implications to your own research

Geographically, the list covers Japan, Italy, France, US, India, the Vatican, and Greece.

(E=English, H=Hebrew)

Jews, Color, Race:
Gary Phillip Zola (E) “Bone of Our Bone and Flesh of Our Flesh”: The Judaization of Abraham Lincoln
Gil Ribak (E) “The Jew Usually Left Those Crimes to Esau”: Immigrant Jewish Responses to Accusations of Jewish Criminality in New York City, 1908–1912
Shlomi Deloia (E) Race, Whiteness, and the Jewish American Immigration Novel of the 1920s
Efraim Sicher (E) The “Jew’s Passage to India”: Race, Color, and Hybridity in Desai and Rushdie
Shmuel Trigano (E) Towards a Sociology of Judaism
Inbal Ester Cicurel (H) Karaites in Israel: A Religious Community in Changes

Attitude Towards the Jews in the Axis States:
Tommaso Dell’era (E) The Catholic Church, Racism and Anti-Semitism (1934–1939): New Documentation from the Vatican Archives
Maria Costanza-Caredio (E) The Italian Racial Laws
Simona Salustri (E) The Reinstatement of Jewish Teachers in Italian Universities
Chizuko Takao (E) Japan Faces its Jews

Studies in Holocaust Research:
Miriam Gillis-Carlebach (H) A Look at the Suffering and Resourcefulness of Holocaust-Surviving Children as Expressed in Their Own Testimonies
Hava Eshkoli (H) The Plan of Resettlement of Jewish Refugees in Alaska during the Holocaust
Yitzchak Kerem (H) Reevaluation of Rescue in Thessaloniki

Jewish Displaced Persons in Italy after the Holocaust:
Cinzia Villani(E) The Arrival and Early Stay of Jewish DPs in Italy: The South Tyrol-Milan Route
Arturo Marzano (E) Between Florence and Rome: The Presence of Jewish DPs in Central Italy
Elena Mazzini (E) The Representation of Jewish DP’s in the Italian Press and in Memoir Writing

Tracing the Tribe hopes that this series will inspire, raise awareness and encourage readers to explore their own history as well as Jewish history in general.

Advertisements

Jews of the Gold Rush

The blogosphere has a new entry called Jews of the Gold Rush.

Currently, there are only four entries (the blog went live in July), and the entries are only photographs (no text) of gravestones, homes and plaques.

There seems to be nothing about the Sacramento-based author, other than the name Toldot (generations, in Hebrew), but the topic is certainly interesting.

[NOTE: Bob Wascou of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento emailed Tracing the Tribe on August 13, informing us know that Toldot is Victoria Fisch. She is working on a project documenting Northern California resources for a future Avotaynu book.]

Many Jews caught gold fever and tried their luck in Northern California, Nevada, Colorado, Alaska, British Columbia and Australia, as discoveries were announced. Abandoned cemeteries with obviously Jewish gravestones can be found in many of these areas, indicating that Members of the Tribe were among the pioneers.

Tracing the Tribe has previously blogged about these pioneers, so for more information, view these posts:

Resources: Gold Rush Jews

Seattle: Schwabacher & Co. (Klondike Gold Rush)

British Columbia: Pioneer Jewish History (BC’s Gold Rush)

19th Century Jewish Businesswomen

Washington: Bellingham’s Jewish History

Brown University’s rare maps (California Gold Rush maps, among others)

Australia: Virtual Jewish Tour

There are others that mention Gold Rush Jews; Use Tracing the Tribe’s Google search box for “gold rush” and see what else is there.

Welcome to Jews of the Gold Rush!

Northern California: The frozen chosen, April 27

Alaska’s frozen chosen – the Jews of Alaska – is the topic for the next meeting of the Peninsula branch of the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, on Monday, April 27.

The meeting starts at 7pm at Congregation Beth Am, in Los Altos Hills.

Jerry Delson and Janet Mohr will present “Jewish Outposts: Jews in Alaska and Adventures You Might Enjoy.”

Starting in 1995, Jerry took advantage of regular business trips to Alaska to pursue his interest in genealogy wherever he might be. He attended conferences of the Anchorage Genealogical Society and presented genealogy workshops at Congregation Beth Sholom. He has enjoyed contacts with Jews in Sitka and in Fairbanks and will describe Fairbanks’ star attraction, the Summer Arts Festival. This year’s edition will offer, for the first time, a Jewish choral music course.

In 1952, Janet was starting high school when her family moved to Anchorage. She learned about growing up Jewish in Alaska, and her parents – from Vienna – took an active role in Anchorage’s cultural life. Graduate studies at Stanford brought Janet to the Bay Area, but she continues to have close ties with friends in Anchorage.

Attendance is free and everyone is invited. This is a change from the previously scheduled program. For more information and future programs, view the SFBAJGS website.

Northern California: The frozen chosen, April 27

Alaska’s frozen chosen – the Jews of Alaska – is the topic for the next meeting of the Peninsula branch of the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, on Monday, April 27.

The meeting starts at 7pm at Congregation Beth Am, in Los Altos Hills.

Jerry Delson and Janet Mohr will present “Jewish Outposts: Jews in Alaska and Adventures You Might Enjoy.”

Starting in 1995, Jerry took advantage of regular business trips to Alaska to pursue his interest in genealogy wherever he might be. He attended conferences of the Anchorage Genealogical Society and presented genealogy workshops at Congregation Beth Sholom. He has enjoyed contacts with Jews in Sitka and in Fairbanks and will describe Fairbanks’ star attraction, the Summer Arts Festival. This year’s edition will offer, for the first time, a Jewish choral music course.

In 1952, Janet was starting high school when her family moved to Anchorage. She learned about growing up Jewish in Alaska, and her parents – from Vienna – took an active role in Anchorage’s cultural life. Graduate studies at Stanford brought Janet to the Bay Area, but she continues to have close ties with friends in Anchorage.

Attendance is free and everyone is invited. This is a change from the previously scheduled program. For more information and future programs, view the SFBAJGS website.

Northern California: The frozen chosen, April 27

Alaska’s frozen chosen – the Jews of Alaska – is the topic for the next meeting of the Peninsula branch of the San Francisco Bay Area Jewish Genealogical Society, on Monday, April 27.

The meeting starts at 7pm at Congregation Beth Am, in Los Altos Hills.

Jerry Delson and Janet Mohr will present “Jewish Outposts: Jews in Alaska and Adventures You Might Enjoy.”

Starting in 1995, Jerry took advantage of regular business trips to Alaska to pursue his interest in genealogy wherever he might be. He attended conferences of the Anchorage Genealogical Society and presented genealogy workshops at Congregation Beth Sholom. He has enjoyed contacts with Jews in Sitka and in Fairbanks and will describe Fairbanks’ star attraction, the Summer Arts Festival. This year’s edition will offer, for the first time, a Jewish choral music course.

In 1952, Janet was starting high school when her family moved to Anchorage. She learned about growing up Jewish in Alaska, and her parents – from Vienna – took an active role in Anchorage’s cultural life. Graduate studies at Stanford brought Janet to the Bay Area, but she continues to have close ties with friends in Anchorage.

Attendance is free and everyone is invited. This is a change from the previously scheduled program. For more information and future programs, view the SFBAJGS website.

Label posts A

label posts A

Alaska: A Jewish museum

Alaska’s tiny Jewish community, according to a Jerusalem Post article, numbers about 3,000-5,000 and most live in the largest city, Anchorage. The whole state’s population is about the same as Tel Aviv.

Now an Alaska Jewish Historical Museum is being planned, and is expected to attract interest from the state’s residents and an annual 2 million tourists.

Among famous Jewish residents were Jay Rabinowitz, “the beloved, influential late chief justice of Alaska’s Supreme Court,” and Anchorage’s first mayor Leopold David.

Some of the earliest Jews were Russian fur traders, and San Francisco traders were among the first to think up the idea of acquiring Alaska from Russia.

The museum’s exhibits will include one about Alaska Airlines’s participation in bringing some 40,000 Yemenite Jews to Israel after the declaration of the state in 1948. “Alaska Airline pilots were bush pilots from the war,” the Russian-born Israel-raised Greenberg said. “They were tough, flew in the worst conditions and worst places. So they could fly even under the danger of being shot at. They were looking for charters, for business, and one flight turned into many flights to bring all those people to Israel.”

The Chabad rabbi in Anchorage, Yosef Greenberg, is one of two rabbis (and three congregations) in Alaska. He came up with the museum concept, which will open in 2009, as part of a Lubavitch Center, housing a pre-school, Hebrew school and synagogue.

The museum will cost an estimated $5 million, of which $850,000 was given by the state after the local community raised about $750,000. A Chicago philanthropist pledged half the balance..

To read more, click here.