New York: Defining Sephardic identity, Jan. 14

A kick-off event exploring identity in New York’s Sephardic communities will take place at the Next Generation Culture Café of the American Sephardi Foundation (ASF) in January.

“Defining Sephardic: A Roundtable Discussion on Sephardic Identity” begins at 6.30pm, Thursday, January 14.

Moderated by filmmaker and Be-chol Lashon’s New York director Lacey Schwartz, the participants will be:

Zena Babayov: New York University master’s (communications) student and active member of the Bukharan community in Forest Hills, Queens.

Mijal Bitton: Yeshiva University/Stern College junior from Argentina and an active member of the Sephardic Community of Great Neck, Long Island.

Sion Setton: Manhattan’s Safra Synagogue director of youth programming, with Iraqi, Syrian and Egyptian heritage.

Matieu Furster: Software engineer with both Moroccan Sephardi and Russian Ashkenazi heritage.

Admission is free. Light refreshments served. Email reservations or call 212-294-8301 x8356.

This is the first event of a year-long program funded by the Edmond J. Safra Philanthropic Foundation. ASF also received assistance from the Consulate General of Spain in New York.

For more information, click on the ASF site and see future events.

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World Jewish Studies: Latin American topics

The World Jewish Studies Conference, held in Israel during August, also covered Latin American Jewry.

Readers may ask the purpose of listing topics from a conference that has concluded. Tracing the Tribe believes that this list, and the others to follow in other posts, will inspire, educate and encourage readers to investigate topics of interest relevant to their own history or those in which they may have other interests.

These topics cover important volunteer participation in archival projects, organization of collections, and information on specific communities (Mexico, Morocco, Argentina, US, Israel) .

Here’s that section of topics, which was sponsored at the conference by the Latin American Jewry Research Association (Sección del Judaísmo Latinoamericano AMILAT – Asociación de Investigación del Judaísmo Latinoamericano).

Here’s some of what you missed (S=Spanish, E=English, H=Hebrew):

Special Panel on Archives with Collections on Latin American Jewry
Alicia Gojman de Backal (E) The Documentation Center of the Ashkenazi Community in Mexico City and its Recognition by UNESCO
Project of Registration of Documentation in Israeli Archives by members of the Israeli Association for Promotion of Jewish Latin American Studies
Hadasa Assulin (E) Latin American Volunteers and their Contribution to the Archive’s Work
Moshe Goler (H) Recruitment of Volunteers
Theodor Bar Shalom (H) Organization and Registration of Material from Latin America
Iosef Rozen (H) Organization and Registration of the Collection of the Jewish Colonization Association

American Jewish Communities of Syrian Origin
Margalit Bejarano (E) Between Law and Reality: Mixed Marriages and Conversions among Syrian Ladino Speakers and Moroccan Jews in Buenos Aires
Sarina Roffé (E) The Takanah Against Marriage to Converts of the Syrian and Near Eastern Communities of Brooklyn
Alicia Hamui Halabe (E) La “Retakanización” de la Comunidad Maguén David en México
Susana Brauner (S) Religión, etnicidad y política: los argentinos-judíos de origen sirio

Tracing the Tribe is investigating whether the transcripts will be posted for the sessions and will report back.

JewishGen: New ShtetLinks added

The following new pages have been added to JewishGen’s ShtetLinks. These pages create memorials to those Jewish communities that once lived there and provide a valuable resource for future generations.

Some are new (N), some updated (U) and some newly adopted (A). Do check them out for valuable information.

ARGENTINA

Basavilbaso (Lucienville) (N)

HUNGARY

Hodmezovasarhely (N)

Tiszalok(N)

Ujfeherto (Ratzfert) (N)

SLOVAKIA

Michalovce (Nagymihaly) (N)

CZECH REPUBLIC

Mikulov (Nikolsburg) (A)

CHINA

Harbin (U)

For more information on either starting a page or adopting an orphan page, email ShtetLinks to reach JewishGen ShtetLinks vice president Susana Leistner Bloch or ShtetLinks technical coordinator Barbara Ellman.

JewishGen: New ShtetLinks added

The following new pages have been added to JewishGen’s ShtetLinks. These pages create memorials to those Jewish communities that once lived there and provide a valuable resource for future generations.

Some are new (N), some updated (U) and some newly adopted (A). Do check them out for valuable information.

ARGENTINA

Basavilbaso (Lucienville) (N)

HUNGARY

Hodmezovasarhely (N)

Tiszalok(N)

Ujfeherto (Ratzfert) (N)

SLOVAKIA

Michalovce (Nagymihaly) (N)

CZECH REPUBLIC

Mikulov (Nikolsburg) (A)

CHINA

Harbin (U)

For more information on either starting a page or adopting an orphan page, email ShtetLinks to reach JewishGen ShtetLinks vice president Susana Leistner Bloch or ShtetLinks technical coordinator Barbara Ellman.

Argentina: Basavilbaso community site


For 25 years, Yehuda Mathov (Monosson, Israel) has collected information on more than 6,000 residents of the town of Basavilbaso, Argentina, also known as Lucienville. It was established by Baron Maurice de Hirsch and the Jewish Colonization Association in the 1890s.

The photo above shows immigrants arriving at Buenos Aires port circa 1900.

Mathov has created a new JewishGen ShtetLinks website for the town; view it here.

Many settlers emigrated from Kherson and Bessarabia (southern Ukraine and Moldova). The first South American agricultural cooperative was established in this settlement.

To see names of immigrants in the smaller settlements of the area, click here. These smaller areas were Novabuco, Aquerman, Villa Mantero, Las 1300, Escrinia, Gilbert, Lucienville, Colonia San Juan, Linea and others. This link shows the size of the plot and plot numbers for each person/family.

Under Historical Records, find documents from many sources, including business records, occupations, farm records and censuses, town residents and addresses, abandoned farms. One interesting example lists the assets of a farm back in 1896 and compares it with the much more extensive assets in 1926.

Under Family Stories, find memoirs (PDF format) in English, but mostly in Spanish. The Photo Gallery shows images of people and documents. There is a list of useful links and a bibliography.

Readers with connections to the town are invited to contribute memories and material. Contact Mathov here.

Argentina: Basavilbaso community site


For 25 years, Yehuda Mathov (Monosson, Israel) has collected information on more than 6,000 residents of the town of Basavilbaso, Argentina, also known as Lucienville. It was established by Baron Maurice de Hirsch and the Jewish Colonization Association in the 1890s.

The photo above shows immigrants arriving at Buenos Aires port circa 1900.

Mathov has created a new JewishGen ShtetLinks website for the town; view it here.

Many settlers emigrated from Kherson and Bessarabia (southern Ukraine and Moldova). The first South American agricultural cooperative was established in this settlement.

To see names of immigrants in the smaller settlements of the area, click here. These smaller areas were Novabuco, Aquerman, Villa Mantero, Las 1300, Escrinia, Gilbert, Lucienville, Colonia San Juan, Linea and others. This link shows the size of the plot and plot numbers for each person/family.

Under Historical Records, find documents from many sources, including business records, occupations, farm records and censuses, town residents and addresses, abandoned farms. One interesting example lists the assets of a farm back in 1896 and compares it with the much more extensive assets in 1926.

Under Family Stories, find memoirs (PDF format) in English, but mostly in Spanish. The Photo Gallery shows images of people and documents. There is a list of useful links and a bibliography.

Readers with connections to the town are invited to contribute memories and material. Contact Mathov here.

Argentina: Basavilbaso community site


For 25 years, Yehuda Mathov (Monosson, Israel) has collected information on more than 6,000 residents of the town of Basavilbaso, Argentina, also known as Lucienville. It was established by Baron Maurice de Hirsch and the Jewish Colonization Association in the 1890s.

The photo above shows immigrants arriving at Buenos Aires port circa 1900.

Mathov has created a new JewishGen ShtetLinks website for the town; view it here.

Many settlers emigrated from Kherson and Bessarabia (southern Ukraine and Moldova). The first South American agricultural cooperative was established in this settlement.

To see names of immigrants in the smaller settlements of the area, click here. These smaller areas were Novabuco, Aquerman, Villa Mantero, Las 1300, Escrinia, Gilbert, Lucienville, Colonia San Juan, Linea and others. This link shows the size of the plot and plot numbers for each person/family.

Under Historical Records, find documents from many sources, including business records, occupations, farm records and censuses, town residents and addresses, abandoned farms. One interesting example lists the assets of a farm back in 1896 and compares it with the much more extensive assets in 1926.

Under Family Stories, find memoirs (PDF format) in English, but mostly in Spanish. The Photo Gallery shows images of people and documents. There is a list of useful links and a bibliography.

Readers with connections to the town are invited to contribute memories and material. Contact Mathov here.