Read Tracing the Tribe at its original site

Tracing the Tribe will no longer update its mirror site here, as it is confusing readers  interested in Jewish genealogy’s developments and resources. 

All new posts will ONLY be available at the original site
http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com

Comments posted at this mirror site will not be read or answered, so please leave your comments at the original site, http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com

Send questions to ask@tracingthetribe.com

Sign up for email subscriptions at the original site http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com  and be the first to know when new posts have appeared.

I look forward to seeing you at http://tracingthetribe.blogspot.com

Schelly

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San Diego: Using Ancestry.com, May 16

Our geneablogging colleague Randy Seaver will speak on “Using Ancestry.com Databases and Family Trees Effectively,” at the next meeting of the San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society, on Sunday, May 16.
The program runs from 1-3pm, at the Lawrence Family JCC in La Jolla.
Randy will discuss and demonstrate these topics and more and will offer recommendations.

The Ancestry.com subscription website has many wonderful features – it’s like a lavish buffet where it is difficult to choose! What is best to do and how do you use it?
Searches: basic or advanced search; new or old search screens; exact or ranked matches; full names or wild cards; specific or all databases; restricted collection or whole collection.

For family trees: public or private; one-editor or group editors; GEDCOM upload or enter-by-hand; upload photos and documents; attach historical documents; add stories; “collect” data from others; synchronization with software; etc.

A native San Diegan, Randy is a graduate of San Diego State University in Aerospace Engineering, and is a retired aerodynamics engineer with a 38-year career at Rohr/Goodrich in Chula Vista. His ancestry is mainly colonial New England and Upper Atlantic, with some colonial German, French and Dutch forebears, and several 19th-century English immigrants.

Randy is one of our master geneabloggers, authoring Genea-Musings, The Geneaholic and the Chula Vista Genealogy Cafe.

His many genealogy activities include the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (former president, current newsletter editor and research chair); speaking to Southern California societies, libraries and groups; teaching OASIS senior adults beginning computer genealogy classes; authors the Genealogy 2.0 column for the FGS’s ForumMagazine; and is a member of NGS, NEHGS, SDGS and CGSSD.

Jerusalem Post: Tracing the Tribe, other gen resources mentioned

David Shamah, who writes on Internet and technology for the Jerusalem Post (print/online), published a roots column today listing various Jewish and general genealogy resources.

“Hi-Tech 101: At the roots of it all” noted that “If you’ve thought about the idea of putting together a family tree, the Internet can be a great friend.”

Sources mentioned for tips, information and how to peel away the layers of the past included:

Google’s cache, Google Earth and Google News
Genealogy Gems podcast and the regular site.
Cyndi’s List
Tracing the Tribe (happy dance!)
Roots TV’s Jewish Roots channel
Yad Vashem
JewishGen
Ellis Island
Tribal Pages

In my opinion, there were two major omissions: SephardicGen.com and MyHeritage.com.

Shamah noted links to a page of common genealogical research mistakes at ShoestringGenealogy. A link (broken) was given to a page that I hope refutes the myth that anyone’s name was changed at Ellis Island – if we only had a penny for each time this myth has been perpetuated by people who should know better.
 
Read the complete article at the link above.

Ancestor Approved: 10 things about my ancestors

Tracing the Tribe has received the Ancestor Approved award from Pat and Judy, the GenealogyGals.

Their blog is a joint effort.

Award recipients are supposed to report on 10 things learned about our ancestors that have surprised, humbled, or enlightened us, and then pass along the award to 10 more genealogy bloggers who are doing their ancestors proud.

1. Surprised: At the life of my maternal great-grandmother Riva BANK TALALAY – born in a shtetl outside Kovno – who was ran away to the Gypsies – so the story goes – to avoid a disliked marriage. Along the way, she learned herbal healing, midwifery, reading tarot cards and palmistry. When she did marry Aron Peretz Talalay and moved to his agricultural colony Vorotinschtina, some 12 miles southwest of Mogilev, Belarus, she was known for creating the first closet in the shtetl. In Newark, New Jersey, she was also a midwife and healer and well-known for getting her way to make living better for her family.

2. Surprised: That the generation-to-generation one-liner – “This was our name in Spain” – has been corroborated by archival research in Spain and DNA genetic testing.

3. Enlightened: Our TALALAY family’s first immigrant ancestor met an English-speaker on the boat over in 1898 who advised him to change his name as no one would give a job to Mr. Tell-a-lie. Thus TOLLIN, TALLIN, TAYLOR, TOLL, TALL and – of course – those lost Philadelphia FEINSTEINs, came about.

4. Enlightened: My maternal FINK (Suchostaw, Galicia -> Ukraine) grandfather and his brothers had a large building maintenance company in New York City. Once, during a window-cleaners’ strike, a worker was quoted as calling his employers, “those rats, the FINKs.” According to family story, the term “rat-fink” was born.

5. Surprised: On hearing that my mother, as a teen, used to swim across Kauneonga Lake (Catskills, Sullivan County, about 10 miles from Monticello) frequently. It is a very large lake!

6. Humbled: To have found at least one lost branch of the Dardashti family, and thus fulfilling a request of my husband’s eldest aunt Nane-jan – made more than 35 years ago in Teheran – to find the lost branches (descendants of relatives who became Moslem) and tell them that they had cousins who thought about them all the time.

7. Humbled: To think about the difficulties Nane-jan underwent as the first Jewish girl to go to school in Teheran in 1902. The community stopped buying from her father, a butcher, and she endured taunts and attacks on her way to school. All her sisters also went to school, with some of them becoming French teachers. It wasn’t easy being a father with such advanced enlightened thinking in those days.

8. Frequently flabbergasted when thinking of our newly-connected TALALAY-KATSNELSON relatives (from Bobruisk, Belarus) in Melbourne, Australia. Their eldest daughter Nelly is a journalist and her daughter is Miliana. I’m Schelly, a journalist and our daughter is Liana. Do you also hear Twilight Zone music?

9. Surprised at how much cousin Leon in Melbourne and I resemble each other. His mother was a Talalay whose father (Gamshei) had moved (reasons still unknown) from Mogilev to Bobruisk.

10. Still shocked: My late cousin Victor Talalay (Toronto) and I both located information about the family branch in Israel at the same time, decades ago, when we separately visited Israel and found the data in the English phone book. We each dutifully copied the info and held onto the scraps of paper with name, address and phone number for decades. I finally wrote and located the granddaughter as her grandfather, who placed the entry every year, had died only a year or so prior. He had placed the info in the English phone book every year hoping that US relatives would find it and contact him. He had arrived from Berlin (after leaving Mogilev in 1902 and going to London and Germany) to Israel in 1933. Moral: Never procrastinate when it comes to following up on all clues to family history.

Since I am coming into this award late – procrastination still runs in our family – and I believe almost all bloggers have already been tagged, I am awarding this coveted prize to everyone who has not already been noted.

Best 40 Blogs: Tracing the Tribe is honored!

Family Tree Magazine has just announced the list of 40 best genealogy blogs in the May 2010 issue. Winners just received an email from editor Diane Haddad.

Tracing the Tribe is honored to be among the five blogs in the Heritage category.


In the magazine’s “Fab 40” on-line article, Maureen Taylor writes:

Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog

Schelly Talalay Dardashti’s passion for Jewish genealogy comes through every post. Since August 2006, she’s written on genealogy news and resources, research strategies, Jewish history, museums, and her experiences tracing her own Jewish ancestors through Belarus, Russia, Lithuania and Spain.

Read below for Diane’s email and the list of all 40 winners.

Writes Diane:

That’s not to say, of course, that there aren’t many more stellar blogs among the hundreds family historians use to chronicle their successes and brick walls, share history, offer genealogy guidance and more.

All their legions of posts add up to an extraordinary store of collective knowledge about how to discover, preserve and celebrate your family history.

We’re hoping this look at the genealogy blogosphere inspires you to go exploring for more blogs to add to your reader.

See our online article for the complete “FT40” list, as well as tools to find more genealogy blogs. Congratulations to the following Family Tree 40 bloggers (listed in alphabetical order by category). We admire their writing, research and photography skills, and applaud their work to promote the pursuit of family history. I hope their blogs will proudly wear the Family Tree 40 logo!

All-Around
Creative Gene by Jasia Smasha
footnoteMaven by footnoteMaven
GeneaBloggers by Thomas MacEntee
Genea-Musings by Randy Seaver

Cemetery
The Association of Graveyard Rabbits by several authors
Granite in My Blood by Midge Frazel

Corporate
Ancestry.com Blog by various authors

Genetic Genealogy
The Genetic Genealogist by Blaine Bettinger

Heritage
George Geder by George Geder
Scottish Genealogy News and Events by Chris Paton
Small Leaved Shamrock by Lisa
Steve’s Genealogy Blog by Stephen Danko
Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog by Schelly Talalay Dardashti

How-To
Family Matters by Denise Barrett Olson
Genealogy Guys by George G. Morgan and Drew Smith
Genealogy Tip of the Day by Michael John Neill
The ProGenealogists Blog by various authors

Local & Regional
California Genealogical Society and Library Blog by Kathryn Doyle
Sandusky History by the staff of the Sandusky (Ohio) Library Archives Research Center
Midwestern Microhistory by Harold Henderson

News & Resources
The Ancestry Insider by theAncestry Insider
DearMyrtle by Pat Richley-Erickson
Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter by Dick Eastman
GenealogyBlog by Leland Meitzler

Photos & Heirlooms
The Family Curator by Denise Levenick
Shades of the Departed by footnoteMaven

Personal & Family
Ancestories: The Stories of My Ancestors by Miriam Midkiff
Apple’s Tree by anonymous
BeNotForgot by Vickie Everhart
Educated Genealogist by Sheri Fenley
Greta’s Genealogy Blog by Greta Koehl
Heritage Happens by Cheryl Fleming Palmer
Herstoryan by Herstoryan
Janet the Researcher by Janet Iles
Kinexxions by Becky Wiseman
Little Bytes of Life by Elizabeth
Our Georgia Roots by Luckie Daniels
WeTree by Amy Coffin
West in New England by Bill West
What’s Past is Prologue by Donna Pointkouski

Read the online article by Maureen Taylor at the link above.

Congratulations to all our geneablogger colleagues on this honor!

Toronto: ShalomLife article, Part 2, online

The second installment of an interview with Tracing the Tribe is now online at ShalomLife in Toronto.

See some old family photos and read Dan Verbin’s story here.
Questions answered include:
  • How I caught the gen bug (for which there is no known antidote),
  • How far I’ve tracked back on my two main research lines,
  • What’s different about Jewish records vs general records,
  • Is it harder for Jewish genealogists than others to trace their families,
  • The differences among Ashkenazi, Sephardic and Mizrahi research;
  • Crypto-Jews/conversos/bnai anousim, and
  • What I’m doing now (including Hong Kong and Australia).
Back to getting some blogging done in Hong Kong.

On the road again: Hong Kong, Australia

Tracing the Tribe’s first-ever trip to Hong Kong and Australia begins tomorrow and I’ll be blogging every day.

In Hong Kong, my schedule includes:
  • Wednesday, February 24, 8pm, at the Jewish Community Center: “The IberianAshkenaz DNA Project: So You Think You’re Ashkenazi?”
  • Thursday, February 25, 8pm, at the Jewish Community Center: “Introduction to Jewish Genealogy,” for the community.
  • During the week, I’ll also present “Intro to Jewish Genealogy” for students at Carmel College.

I’ll do some sightseeing (weather permitting), enjoy the cuisine, meet interesting people and spend Purim in Hong Kong. Of course, I’ll be blogging, so stay tuned.

On March 1, I fly to Melbourne, Australia, for the Second Australian National Jewish Genealogy Conference (March 7-9). I’m honored to have been invited for this event and look forward to seeing the Australian Jewish genealogy community.

My presentations include the IberianAshkenaz DNA Project as well as social media for today’s genealogists.

Friends and family are part of the Australian schedule, including cousins who come from Bobruisk, Belarus and from America (in Sydney). I’ll be visiting the Sydney cousins for the second part of my trip, and may do some additional talks there.

On the return flight, I will speak on MyHeritage.com, presenting an overview of its tools and features and encouraging people to participate in the new Beit Hatfutsot-MyHeritage.com partnership.

Family trees created with a special version of the free MyHeritage software will be periodically transferred to Beit Hatfutsot for digital archiving for ever.

This should be a very exciting trip, new sights, fascinating people and much much more.

Blogging will be on the menu in Australia as well.

Readers who either live in these destinations or who have been there before, are invited to suggest their favorite experiences – things to see, places to eat, etc.

Next week in Hong Kong!