Hong Kong: ‘Asian Jewish Life,’ spring issue online

On my recent Hong Kong visit, I met with editor-in-chief Erica Lyons of “Asian Jewish Life: A Journal of Spirit, Society and Culture.”

The new AJL spring 2010 issue is now online with stories covering India, Shanghai, Cambodia, foodies, book reviews, film and more.

“Asian Jewish Life is a contemporary journal of Jewish diaspora life throughout Asia. As Jews in Asia we are but a tiny minority unified by tradition, a love for Israel, common contemporary concerns and shared values. While Asian Jewish Life is a common media forum designed to share regional Jewish thoughts, ideas and culture and promote unity, it also celebrates our individuality and our diverse backgrounds and customs.”

Here’s the table of contents (read each online or download the PDF at the link above):

— Inbox: Your letters
— Letter from the Editor
— India Journal- Life with the Bene Ephraim (Bonita Nathan Sussman and Gerald Sussman)
— Eating Kosher Dog Meat: Jewish in Guiyang (Susan Blumberg-Kason)
— Through the Eyes of ZAKA (Jana Daniels)
— Interview: Ambassador Yaron Mayer

— Replanting Roots in Shanghai: Architect Haim Dotan’s journey (Erica Lyons)
— A Palate Grows in Brooklyn: Birth of a foodie (Sandi Butchkiss)
— Poetry by Rachel DeWoskin
— The Death Penalty: What Asia can learn from Judaism (Michael H. Fox)
— Learning to Speak: A cross-cultural love story (Tracy Slater)
— Book Reviews (Susan Blumberg-Kason)
— Places I Love
— Expat Diary: Raising a Jewish Child in Cambodia (Craig Gerard)
— Film in Focus

Each article provides a diverse look into life in Asia, with a Jewish “hook.” Tracing the Tribe will always remember the line “tenderloin of my heart,” from Tracy Slater’s “Learning to Speak.”

Readers and writers with Jewish Asian experiences are invited to submit articles; click here for more information.

If you enjoyed this issue (the winter issue is also online), let Erica know, and tell her you learned about AJL at Tracing the Tribe. Feedback is always welcome.

A great issue, Erica!

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Toronto: ShalomLife article, Part 2, online

The second installment of an interview with Tracing the Tribe is now online at ShalomLife in Toronto.

See some old family photos and read Dan Verbin’s story here.
Questions answered include:
  • How I caught the gen bug (for which there is no known antidote),
  • How far I’ve tracked back on my two main research lines,
  • What’s different about Jewish records vs general records,
  • Is it harder for Jewish genealogists than others to trace their families,
  • The differences among Ashkenazi, Sephardic and Mizrahi research;
  • Crypto-Jews/conversos/bnai anousim, and
  • What I’m doing now (including Hong Kong and Australia).
Back to getting some blogging done in Hong Kong.

On the Radio: Susan King, Tracing the Tribe, Nov. 3

Tracing the Tribe will be featured on Susan E. King’s radio show – “Where genealogy and spirit connect” – on Tuesday, November 3 (see below for the times in your area).

All of Tracing the Tribe’s readers are invited to listen in and ask questions.

We’ll talk about many topics, including the IberianAshkenaz DNA Project at FamilyTreeDNA.com, which has already linked some 75% of ostensible Ashkenazi project participants to Hispanics with known or suspected Jewish roots; Persian Jewish genealogical research, Sephardic research, genealogy blogging, and many other subjects.

Additionally, listeners from around the world may call in with questions – toll-free – by calling 888-815-9756. We are looking forward both to our conversation and to receiving questions from listeners.

To listen live, tune in Tuesday at the following times:

US/Canada: Pacific Time 11am, Mountain Time 12 noon, Central Time 1pm, East Coast 2pm

International: Israel 9pm, UK 7pm. Check other times for your geo-location.

Click here or here to go to the show at the proper time, and there’s also information on how to connect for a better experience. Check out this link now so you’ll know what to do on Tuesday.

Listeners around the world can listen in live and also ask questions, toll free worldwide, by calling 888-815-9756.

For more information on this episode, click this link.

For those who cannot listen in live, the interview will also be available via podcast.

Radio: Daniel Horowitz, Sept. 15

Daniel Horowitz will be interviewed by Susan E. King on her new online radio show on Tuesday, September 15.

The interview is set for 2pm US East Coast (11am US West Coast, 7pm UK, 8pm Europe and 9pm Israel). To see those already interviewd as well as the future schedule, click here.

Daniel is the database and translation manager at MyHeritage.com and is well-known to genealogists for his technology presentations at conferences and to societies. He serves on the IAJGS board of directors, and has been an accomplished genealogist and genealogy educator for many years. His other hats include serving as webmaster for both JFRA Israel and the Horowitz Family Association.

Susan and Daniel will discuss the new technologies available on MyHeritage.com for today’s genealogists. Face Recognition, Smart Matching, Family Tree Builder and Smart Research are just a few of the free MyHeritage tools available to assist genealogists and families to connect and share research.

Born in 1971 and raised in Caracas, Venezuela, Daniel graduated from the Moral y Luces Herzl-Bialik High School. His professional background includes computer technician, BS.c. (Computer Engineering), education and management of educational institutions.

At the high school, he was a computer instructor and instructor/director of the “Searching for My Roots” genealogy project, and created/edited project material and presented workshops for students and parents. In 2001, he received the “Project of the Year” school award, and, in 2004, the Gonzalo Benaim Pinto Venezuela national award. From 1997-2005, his students received nine consecutive awards in the Beth Hatefutsoth/Museum of the Diaspora international competition, “My Family Story.”

Daniel was also the founder, member and lecturer of the Jewish Genealogy Society of Venezuela (AGJUVE). Married with two young children, he and his family made aliyah to Israel in 2005.

JewishGen’s founder, Susan recently interviewed Jewish names book author Alexander Beider, and Daniel is next on the genealogy list.

The schedule of past and future interviews here

View Susan’s website here.

Washington DC: Annie’s Ghosts, May 26

Does your family have a secret? Would you spend years trying to unravel the mystery of an unknown relative?

Steve Luxenberg did, and his quest resulted in “Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret.”

“The secrets emerged, without warning or provocation, on an ordinary April afternoon in 1995. Secrets, I’ve discovered, have a way of working themselves free of their keepers.”

For more on the author – Washington Post senior editor – and his book, click here.

The 6th & I Historic Synagogue’s genealogy series continues at 7pm Tuesday, May 26 when Bob Woodward and Steve Luxenberg discuss the process and implications of applying investigative journalism to family history.

In his book, Luxenberg reveals the substantial challenges and rewards of holding a microscope to the relationships we hold most dear.

The event includes a book signing. For tickets ($8 in advance, $10 at the event, or one free ticket with the purchase of the book, $25), click here.

My mother was an only child. That’s what she told everyone, sometimes within minutes of meeting them. When I heard that my mother had been hiding the existence of a sister, I was bewildered. A sister? I was certain that she had no siblings, just as I knew that her name was Beth, that she had no middle name, and that she had raised her children to, above all, tell the truth.

Part memoir, part detective story, part history, Annie’s Ghosts revolves around three main characters (my mom, her sister and me as narrator/detective/son), several important secondary ones (my grandparents, my father and several relatives whom I found in the course of reporting on the book), as well as Eloise, the vast county mental hospital where my secret aunt was confined—despite her initial protestations—all of her adult life.

This program should offer great appeal to family historians and genealogists in the DC area.

Washington DC: Annie’s Ghosts, May 26

Does your family have a secret? Would you spend years trying to unravel the mystery of an unknown relative?

Steve Luxenberg did, and his quest resulted in “Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret.”

“The secrets emerged, without warning or provocation, on an ordinary April afternoon in 1995. Secrets, I’ve discovered, have a way of working themselves free of their keepers.”

For more on the author – Washington Post senior editor – and his book, click here.

The 6th & I Historic Synagogue’s genealogy series continues at 7pm Tuesday, May 26 when Bob Woodward and Steve Luxenberg discuss the process and implications of applying investigative journalism to family history.

In his book, Luxenberg reveals the substantial challenges and rewards of holding a microscope to the relationships we hold most dear.

The event includes a book signing. For tickets ($8 in advance, $10 at the event, or one free ticket with the purchase of the book, $25), click here.

My mother was an only child. That’s what she told everyone, sometimes within minutes of meeting them. When I heard that my mother had been hiding the existence of a sister, I was bewildered. A sister? I was certain that she had no siblings, just as I knew that her name was Beth, that she had no middle name, and that she had raised her children to, above all, tell the truth.

Part memoir, part detective story, part history, Annie’s Ghosts revolves around three main characters (my mom, her sister and me as narrator/detective/son), several important secondary ones (my grandparents, my father and several relatives whom I found in the course of reporting on the book), as well as Eloise, the vast county mental hospital where my secret aunt was confined—despite her initial protestations—all of her adult life.

This program should offer great appeal to family historians and genealogists in the DC area.

Washington DC: Annie’s Ghosts, May 26

Does your family have a secret? Would you spend years trying to unravel the mystery of an unknown relative?

Steve Luxenberg did, and his quest resulted in “Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey Into a Family Secret.”

“The secrets emerged, without warning or provocation, on an ordinary April afternoon in 1995. Secrets, I’ve discovered, have a way of working themselves free of their keepers.”

For more on the author – Washington Post senior editor – and his book, click here.

The 6th & I Historic Synagogue’s genealogy series continues at 7pm Tuesday, May 26 when Bob Woodward and Steve Luxenberg discuss the process and implications of applying investigative journalism to family history.

In his book, Luxenberg reveals the substantial challenges and rewards of holding a microscope to the relationships we hold most dear.

The event includes a book signing. For tickets ($8 in advance, $10 at the event, or one free ticket with the purchase of the book, $25), click here.

My mother was an only child. That’s what she told everyone, sometimes within minutes of meeting them. When I heard that my mother had been hiding the existence of a sister, I was bewildered. A sister? I was certain that she had no siblings, just as I knew that her name was Beth, that she had no middle name, and that she had raised her children to, above all, tell the truth.

Part memoir, part detective story, part history, Annie’s Ghosts revolves around three main characters (my mom, her sister and me as narrator/detective/son), several important secondary ones (my grandparents, my father and several relatives whom I found in the course of reporting on the book), as well as Eloise, the vast county mental hospital where my secret aunt was confined—despite her initial protestations—all of her adult life.

This program should offer great appeal to family historians and genealogists in the DC area.