UK: ‘Finding family’ workshop, Dec. 17

The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain will focus on finding family in England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland, at its meeting on Thursday, December 17.

The meeting runs from 7.30-9.30pm at the JGSGB Library in London.

The session will cover information for beginners as well as those more advanced, and for confident and less-confident computer users.

To register, send an email to reserve a place. Fee: JGSGB members, free; others, £5.00.

For more information and address, click JGS of Great Britain (JGSGB).

Irish Times: Free access through Dec. 14

To celebrate 150 years of the Irish Times, the paper is offering free access to its archives through December 14.

For more information, visit the paper’s site and check out the archive. Choose from text archive for stories from 1996, and the digital archive for everything from 1859 to the present.

Using the term “Jewish,” more than 30,000 hits were returned, dating from 1859, when the paper began. Using the term “Jew” returned nearly 48,000 hits.

An interesting item is the date graph. If you are searching for a specific term, you can see – via a sliding bar – the number of stories on that topic in a certain year. Here’s the graph using the search term “Jewish”:

In March 1859, there were 151 stories with this term; in March 1904, there were 767 stories including the term.

A sampling of stories from 1859-1901 included meetings of societies to convert Jews, what the Passover holiday signifies, start of Rosh Hashana, Disraeli, statistics of Jews in various countries, persecution of Jews in Russia, a new Dublin synagogue, a meeting of anti-Semites in France, the situation of starving Jews in Palestine, riots in Poland, marriages, ads for kosher butchers, immigration of Russian Jews to Africa, funerals, fires in Amsterdam, legal announcements, Zionist Congress opening, and many stories on the 1904 pogroms across Russia.

The search terms are highlighted, making the references easy to find.

On Tuesday, June 28, 1859, this notice appeared on page 4:

On August 9, 1859, on page 4, under Police Intelligence, this was the lead in a story:


And in a story on Italian statistics on May 7, 1859, these interesting figures appear:


This useful resource can offer genealogists much information as to local and international events, family information and much more. You can capture an article as above as a JPG, print it or save as a PDF.

Do take advantage of free access during December.

Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Ireland: Jewish culture festival, Oct. 18-19

Irish Family History – the blog – had a neat piece on the documentary, “Shalom Ireland,” at the Cork Festival of Jewish Culture, Oct 18-19.

In 1861, there were only 341 Jews living in Ireland, but by the turn of the 20th century the Jewish population had risen to more than 3,000.

In 1901, the largest Jewish populations were in Dublin (2,048), Belfast (708), Cork (359) and Limerick (171).

This autumn, Cork celebrates the Jewish community in the Cork Festival of Jewish Culture, October 18 – 19, 2008. If you are interested in the history of the Jewish community in Ireland, don’t miss out on the screening of ‘Shalom Ireland’.

In this documentary, director Valerie Lapin Ganley reveals Ireland’s remarkable, yet little known Jewish community.

“Shalom Ireland” chronicles the history of Irish Jewry while celebrating the unique culture created by blending Irish and Jewish traditions.
From gun running for the Irish Republican Army during Ireland’s War of Independence to smuggling fellow Jews escaping from the Holocaust into Palestine, “Shalom Ireland” tells the untold story of how Irish Jews participated in the creation of both Ireland and Israel.

Events will take place in Main Restaurant and Boole Lecture Theatre 1, University College Cork.

Saturday,October 18
7-7:15pm
Opening, Cork Festival of Jewish Culture
7:15-8:15pm
Klezmer dance, Yiddish song workshop; Vivi Lachs (London); accompaniment, Klezmer Klub (London)
8:30-9:45pm
Concert, Klezmer Klub (London)
10:00-11:30pm
Concert, The Fireflies (klezmer band, South West Ireland)

Sunday,October 19
4-4:45pm
Lecture, Professor Dermot Keogh, UCC History Department; history of Cork’s Jewish community
5-6pm
Screening, “Shalom Ireland” – history of Ireland’s Jewish community in Ireland
6-6:30pm
Break & refreshments
6:30-7:30pm
Concert, Festival Ensemble
8-9:30pm
Concert, North Strand Klezmer Band (Dublin)
10-11:30pm
Concert, Yurodny (Dublin)

The Festival is held under the patronage of the Lord Mayor of Cork, Brian Bermingham and University College Cork president, Dr. Michael Murphy.
Concert tickets: €10/ €15. For more information: corkjewishfestival@gmail.com

Ireland: Jewish culture festival, Oct. 18-19

Irish Family History – the blog – had a neat piece on the documentary, “Shalom Ireland,” at the Cork Festival of Jewish Culture, Oct 18-19.

In 1861, there were only 341 Jews living in Ireland, but by the turn of the 20th century the Jewish population had risen to more than 3,000.

In 1901, the largest Jewish populations were in Dublin (2,048), Belfast (708), Cork (359) and Limerick (171).

This autumn, Cork celebrates the Jewish community in the Cork Festival of Jewish Culture, October 18 – 19, 2008. If you are interested in the history of the Jewish community in Ireland, don’t miss out on the screening of ‘Shalom Ireland’.

In this documentary, director Valerie Lapin Ganley reveals Ireland’s remarkable, yet little known Jewish community.

“Shalom Ireland” chronicles the history of Irish Jewry while celebrating the unique culture created by blending Irish and Jewish traditions.
From gun running for the Irish Republican Army during Ireland’s War of Independence to smuggling fellow Jews escaping from the Holocaust into Palestine, “Shalom Ireland” tells the untold story of how Irish Jews participated in the creation of both Ireland and Israel.

Events will take place in Main Restaurant and Boole Lecture Theatre 1, University College Cork.

Saturday,October 18
7-7:15pm
Opening, Cork Festival of Jewish Culture
7:15-8:15pm
Klezmer dance, Yiddish song workshop; Vivi Lachs (London); accompaniment, Klezmer Klub (London)
8:30-9:45pm
Concert, Klezmer Klub (London)
10:00-11:30pm
Concert, The Fireflies (klezmer band, South West Ireland)

Sunday,October 19
4-4:45pm
Lecture, Professor Dermot Keogh, UCC History Department; history of Cork’s Jewish community
5-6pm
Screening, “Shalom Ireland” – history of Ireland’s Jewish community in Ireland
6-6:30pm
Break & refreshments
6:30-7:30pm
Concert, Festival Ensemble
8-9:30pm
Concert, North Strand Klezmer Band (Dublin)
10-11:30pm
Concert, Yurodny (Dublin)

The Festival is held under the patronage of the Lord Mayor of Cork, Brian Bermingham and University College Cork president, Dr. Michael Murphy.
Concert tickets: €10/ €15. For more information: corkjewishfestival@gmail.com