Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Feeling stressed? Maybe this will help

Forbes.com just put out the list of the top 10 happiest countries to live in.

According to a British Medical Journal 2005, research in several countries indicated that although individuals typically get richer during their lifetimes, they don’t get happier. What brings joy is family, social and community networks.

Tracing the Tribe hopes that includes genealogy communities!

Here’s the list:

1- Denmark
2- Finland
3- Netherlands
4- Sweden
5- Ireland
6- Canada
7- Switzerland
8- New Zealand
9- Norway
10- Belgium

Data was used from last year’s Gallup World Poll conducted in 140 countries, which asked respondents whether they had experienced six different forms of positive or negative feelings within the last day.

Sample questions: Did you enjoy something you did yesterday? Were you proud of something you did yesteday? Did you learn something yesterday? Were you treated with respect yesterday? No more than 1,000 people, age 15 or older, were surveyed in each country. and the poll was scored from 1-100. The average score was 62.4.

Genealogists would likely answer these questions positively!

Overall economic health was a strong factor. Although the global economic crisis has been felt in every nation, those scoring highest in this poll had some of the highest GDPs per capita in the world.

However, wealth wasn’t the highest indicator. Although Norway ranked highest in GDP per capita, it ranked ninth in the list, despite a GDP per capita of nearly $100,000. New Zealand’s GDP per capita was only a little more than $30,000, yet ranked eighth.

Another important factor is work-life balance. Scandinavian countries work 37 hours per week or less. Low-scoring China has a 47-hour workweek and a GDP per capita of only $3,600.

Low unemployment contributes to happiness. The OECD resercher says “not having a job makes one substantially less satisfied.” Top-ranked Denmark has an unemployment rate of only 2%; the Netherlands, 4.5%; the US, 9% – which didn’t make the top 10.

Read the complete article here.

Norway: Jewish museum opens

There were four Jewish congregations in Oslo in the early 1900s; by 1917, there were only two serving some 1,300 Jews, according to this article.

In 1920 and 1921 they had constructed their own buildings. synagogues. The first, in 1920,was Det Mosaiske Trossamfund i Oslo. It reopened after Jewish survivors returned to Norway in 1945 and after. Still open for services, it is located at 13 Bergstien.

The other, at 15 Calmeyers St., remained closed after the Holocaust as there were too few Jews in Oslo to maintain two congregations.
Calmeyers was used for various businesses; today, parts of the building is now occupied by the Oslo Jewish Museum and it will be used as a museum and cultural center.

A temporary exhibit in honor of Norwegian poet Henrik Wergeland will open this month., and the museum will offer a week of Jewish culture, with theatre, concerts and other events.

The museum was officially opened by Crown Prince Haakon.

Norway was one of the last European countries without such a museum in its capital. Although Trondheim has had a local Jewish museum, Oslo had little display of Jewish history and culture other than minor exhibits at the Norwegian Folk Museum and at the recently opened Holocaust Center.

The old Calmeyers Gate 15B’s synagogue has been restored and reopened to tell the story of Jews in Norway since the first immigrated more than 150 years ago.

Norway’s government ministers for defense and culture joined the crown prince at the opening, along with Israel’s ambassador to Norway.

The debut exhibit describes how Norwegian Jews influenced cultural life and the struggle against German occupation during World War II.

Norway: Jewish museum opens

There were four Jewish congregations in Oslo in the early 1900s; by 1917, there were only two serving some 1,300 Jews, according to this article.

In 1920 and 1921 they had constructed their own buildings. synagogues. The first, in 1920,was Det Mosaiske Trossamfund i Oslo. It reopened after Jewish survivors returned to Norway in 1945 and after. Still open for services, it is located at 13 Bergstien.

The other, at 15 Calmeyers St., remained closed after the Holocaust as there were too few Jews in Oslo to maintain two congregations.
Calmeyers was used for various businesses; today, parts of the building is now occupied by the Oslo Jewish Museum and it will be used as a museum and cultural center.

A temporary exhibit in honor of Norwegian poet Henrik Wergeland will open this month., and the museum will offer a week of Jewish culture, with theatre, concerts and other events.

The museum was officially opened by Crown Prince Haakon.

Norway was one of the last European countries without such a museum in its capital. Although Trondheim has had a local Jewish museum, Oslo had little display of Jewish history and culture other than minor exhibits at the Norwegian Folk Museum and at the recently opened Holocaust Center.

The old Calmeyers Gate 15B’s synagogue has been restored and reopened to tell the story of Jews in Norway since the first immigrated more than 150 years ago.

Norway’s government ministers for defense and culture joined the crown prince at the opening, along with Israel’s ambassador to Norway.

The debut exhibit describes how Norwegian Jews influenced cultural life and the struggle against German occupation during World War II.

Norway: Jewish museum opens

There were four Jewish congregations in Oslo in the early 1900s; by 1917, there were only two serving some 1,300 Jews, according to this article.

In 1920 and 1921 they had constructed their own buildings. synagogues. The first, in 1920,was Det Mosaiske Trossamfund i Oslo. It reopened after Jewish survivors returned to Norway in 1945 and after. Still open for services, it is located at 13 Bergstien.

The other, at 15 Calmeyers St., remained closed after the Holocaust as there were too few Jews in Oslo to maintain two congregations.
Calmeyers was used for various businesses; today, parts of the building is now occupied by the Oslo Jewish Museum and it will be used as a museum and cultural center.

A temporary exhibit in honor of Norwegian poet Henrik Wergeland will open this month., and the museum will offer a week of Jewish culture, with theatre, concerts and other events.

The museum was officially opened by Crown Prince Haakon.

Norway was one of the last European countries without such a museum in its capital. Although Trondheim has had a local Jewish museum, Oslo had little display of Jewish history and culture other than minor exhibits at the Norwegian Folk Museum and at the recently opened Holocaust Center.

The old Calmeyers Gate 15B’s synagogue has been restored and reopened to tell the story of Jews in Norway since the first immigrated more than 150 years ago.

Norway’s government ministers for defense and culture joined the crown prince at the opening, along with Israel’s ambassador to Norway.

The debut exhibit describes how Norwegian Jews influenced cultural life and the struggle against German occupation during World War II.