Tracing the Tribe is now on Facebook

Please note that Tracing the Tribe – The Jewish Genealogy Blog is on hiatus. I no longer post to it, and rarely read the comments here on WordPress or on the original blog site at Blogger.

All activity for Tracing the Tribe is now on Facebook at Tracing the Tribe – Jewish Genealogy on Facebook. You can find it here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/20364215746/

Click on the link, and ask to join. When you are approved, please list the Jewish families you are researching and where they are from, what you have already discovered and what you wish help with. Our nearly 4,000 members are happy to assist with translations and tips on how to proceed with your projects.

Please read the guidelines for the Facebook group. They are very important for the smooth functioning of the group. Here are the guidelines which are also found pinned to the Facebook page:

NEW Simple rules: No politics, no commercial sales, no proselytizing. This is a JEWISH genealogy group and all postings must have some connection to Jewish genealogy. Thanks to all who abide by the rules. Inappropriate posts – and the poster – will be removed immediately. Posts in English, please! ADDITION: All information and documents provided in these posts by members may NOT be used for any purpose whatsoever without the express written consent of the poster.

With best wishes

Schelly

Hungary: Jewish Vital Records Project grows

Does your family history connect to Hungary? Do you know where to find records? JewishGen is a good place to start.

Did you know that Jewish Gen’s All-Hungarian Database (AHD) has been increased with an additional 105,000 new vital records. The AHD now includes some 800,000 records (180,000 birth, 45,000 death, and 25,000 marriage).

Thirteen databases are incorporated into the AHD: including 1828 property tax census, 1848 Jewish census, 1869 Hungarian Census, 1781-1850 other censuses; births, deaths and marriages databases; Holocaust Memorials, Who’s Who in Budapest 1837 and 1845, Yizkor book necrologies, Holocaust Database, JewishGen Family Finder, and the JewishGen Online Worldwide. Burial Registry. Click here to learn more about each database.

Here’s a map showing (circa1900) the ratio of Jewish residents in geographic areas. The darker the area, the higher the percentage of Jewish residents.


Geographical locations for records include Bezi, Budapest, Csenger, Eger, Erdotelek, Erk, Eperejes, Fuzesabony, Gyomore, Gyongyos, Hodasz, Jarmi, Kassa, Kemcse, Kisleta, Koszeg, Mateszalka, Miskolc, Moson, Sztropko, Szeged, Szobrance, and Vag Besztercze.

Still ongoing are the records for Budapest, Gyongyos, Miskolc and Szeged. Today, the database includes 20,000 records from Miskolc and 60,000 from Budapest.

This efforts was made possible by many volunteers who contributed their time, effort and skill to the preservation of these valuable resources. For more information on the volunteers (there were too many to list here) see the AHD site.

The Hungarian Vital Records Project coordinator is Sam Schleman of Malvern, Pennsylvania.

The AHD contains multiple databases searchable on one form. These databases have been contributed by the JewishGen Hungarian Special Interest Group (H-SIG) and individual donors.

The combined databases have over 660,000 entries, referring to individuals living in the current and former territory of Hungary — this includes present-day Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, northern Serbia, northwestern Romania, and subcarpathian Ukraine. The database is a work in progress and new entries are being added regularly.

There is a volunteer opportunity for transcribers as the project is now working on the Budapest records, including the Orthodox community, and for the towns of Miskolc, Anarcs, Apagy, Baja, Papa, Sopron, Szeged and Lackenbach. According to Schleman, no language skills are required. Their philosophy is to use as many transcribers as possible to lighten the workload. If you’d like to volunteer, email Sam.

Visiting New York

Tracing the Tribe has been quiet for a few days as I was traveling from Tel Aviv to New York for my very busy summer of conferences and family.

My favorite European stopover is Zurich and I usually plan a few hours there so I can take the train into town, walk or tram down the Bahnhofstrasse – with its great shopping opportunities – to the lake and take a two-hour cruise to decompress. This is best done on a glorious sunny summer day.

Unfortunately, Zurich was wet and chilly – my raincoat and umbrella were in the checked baggage. On top of that, the flight to New York was delayed for three hours.

Travelers’ hint: Zurich airport has dayrooms, which can be rented for segments of six hours or more. These single, double or triple rooms – with comfortable beds, duvets, showers, wake-up calls – are exceptionally clean, and the prices very affordable. I had a much needed rest as I’d been awake for nearly two days prior to flying out.

Eventually, however, I made it to JFK and our cousins picked me up. The plan was for one day in Great Neck and then into the city to see our daughter and my sister and her family. The Persian social whirl had different plans, which meant a bridal shower on Wednesday night.

Since I would be missing the wedding due to a conference, I was happy to attend this event. It was great fun to join in the festivities – including a Persian henna ceremony and other traditions – and see many relatives at a great party that went from about 4-11pm.

There are few family elders left, so it was good to see khaleh-jan (maternal aunt in Farsi) Mohtaram – the bride’s grandmother – participating in the dancing at her advanced age!

Today, I’ll head into the city for a few days and then to Washington, DC for my first conference, the American Jewish Press Association. From here on, my schedule sounds something like one of those rush tours throughout Europe (if it’s Tuesday, it must be Belgium … or Los Angeles … or Houston … or Chicago – you get the picture).

I’m hoping to get several posts up today and tomorrow.

Visiting New York

Tracing the Tribe has been quiet for a few days as I was traveling from Tel Aviv to New York for my very busy summer of conferences and family.

My favorite European stopover is Zurich and I usually plan a few hours there so I can take the train into town, walk or tram down the Bahnhofstrasse – with its great shopping opportunities – to the lake and take a two-hour cruise to decompress. This is best done on a glorious sunny summer day.

Unfortunately, Zurich was wet and chilly – my raincoat and umbrella were in the checked baggage. On top of that, the flight to New York was delayed for three hours.

Travelers’ hint: Zurich airport has dayrooms, which can be rented for segments of six hours or more. These single, double or triple rooms – with comfortable beds, duvets, showers, wake-up calls – are exceptionally clean, and the prices very affordable. I had a much needed rest as I’d been awake for nearly two days prior to flying out.

Eventually, however, I made it to JFK and our cousins picked me up. The plan was for one day in Great Neck and then into the city to see our daughter and my sister and her family. The Persian social whirl had different plans, which meant a bridal shower on Wednesday night.

Since I would be missing the wedding due to a conference, I was happy to attend this event. It was great fun to join in the festivities – including a Persian henna ceremony and other traditions – and see many relatives at a great party that went from about 4-11pm.

There are few family elders left, so it was good to see khaleh-jan (maternal aunt in Farsi) Mohtaram – the bride’s grandmother – participating in the dancing at her advanced age!

Today, I’ll head into the city for a few days and then to Washington, DC for my first conference, the American Jewish Press Association. From here on, my schedule sounds something like one of those rush tours throughout Europe (if it’s Tuesday, it must be Belgium … or Los Angeles … or Houston … or Chicago – you get the picture).

I’m hoping to get several posts up today and tomorrow.

Almost back to normal!

Dear readers,

My husband will be discharged from the hospital tomorrow (Sunday) and things should be returning to normal very quickly, although he’s facing several weeks of at-home recovery.

We are most thankful for the excellent care he has received at Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv, and for the many private messages of concern and good wishes from friends and readers.

Your daily Jewish genealogy source will soon be up and running again!

Schelly

Almost back to normal!

Dear readers,

My husband will be discharged from the hospital tomorrow (Sunday) and things should be returning to normal very quickly, although he’s facing several weeks of at-home recovery.

We are most thankful for the excellent care he has received at Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv, and for the many private messages of concern and good wishes from friends and readers.

Your daily Jewish genealogy source will soon be up and running again!

Schelly

Why there have been fewer postings

Hello, Tracing the Tribe readers

Regular readers will note that the past week has seen a downturn in frequent postings.

Unfortunately, my husband underwent major emergency surgery 11 days ago and I’ve been at the hospital most nights as well as days. He is well on the road to recovery, thank G-d, and I hope to be back to a more normal schedule in a few days.

For those readers who knew and have sent personal messages, thank you for your concern and prayers.

Some have asked for his Hebrew name to offer a prayer for his recovery; we are grateful for this. The ritual name used is different for various communities. The Persian tradition includes the father’s name, while others use the mother’s name for this ritual. To cover all traditions: he is David ben Yakov va Ester (David, son of Jacob and Esther)

Thank you.

Schelly